Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 69,963   Posts: 1,523,223   Online: 865
      
Page 2 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 50
  1. #11
    daleeman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Dayton, Ohio
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    999
    Images
    17
    Quote Originally Posted by winger View Post
    I agree with Keith and Barry. And... Don't force it. Take some walks (maybe take a camera, but leave it in your bag unless you see something really good), get some fresh air, get some space. Being a caretaker and cleaner-outer take a lot out of you. My parents have spent much of the last year cleaning out my grandmother's house. They're both exhausted with it. They're also planning a trip to Scotland in June. Take some sort of break once you've done the things that absolutely have to be done.
    And maybe it's time for a print sharing get-together near Cuyahoga National Park?
    Bethe,

    Thanks so much for your message of hope. I have been looking in the Great Lakes Region in hopes of seeing a future even pop up in John's delightful neighborhood. Being with friends and sharing images and exploring sounds wonderful.

    I can understand and own the shoes when it comes to clean out of other's homes. My thoughts are with your parents in their efforts and I have always dreamed of visiting Scotland so I hope they have an outstanding time relaxing there.

    Lee

  2. #12
    daleeman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Dayton, Ohio
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    999
    Images
    17
    Quote Originally Posted by jordanstarr View Post
    You might need to push forward without photography for a bit to focus on getting the problems in your life dealt with and when the dust settles, photography will be there and you will have all the energy again and more able to tap back into that mojo. Very few people have the power to turn stress into something truly brilliant. If you aren't one of those people, deal with the barriers to your mojo and when they're gone dive right back into it. I'm certain it will be there when this turbulence in your life has subsided.
    Jordan,
    Your insights into how events bites into so many of these youth's lives gives rise to the fact that many things become prioities in the blink of an eye. I admire you for trying to make a difference in others lives and hope you too stay in the MoJo stream with your creativity.
    Lee

  3. #13
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Minnesota
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    14,171
    Images
    292
    Good luck, Lee!

    I hope everything works out well for both you and your parents. You seem like a true model son for being so diligent with helping your parents. My own folks went through the same with my grandmother over in Sweden at the end of last year, and it drained a lot of their energy and will to do other things, which they simply had to set aside for a while.
    Perhaps what you need is some time, and some pause in your life to just settle your mind around everything that's happened and changed. I had my divorce in 2010, where I moved out of my old house in September 2009, and then sorted things until about June of 2010. In those months I had very little desire for photography, and it wasn't a fun experience, so I mostly left it alone, which I think was necessary. Instead I cooked good meals, spent time with friends, relaxed, had a glass of good wine now and again, and I tried to enjoy every single moment of it.
    But after a few months of stalling photography I was a bit lost, not feeling that it would come back to me, and then a couple of people, whom I'm infinitely grateful to, gave me a kick in the rear to force me to get out there and shoot a roll off, process it, and do something with the negatives. And then do it again. Eventually this reeled me in, and I found a place in photography where I am even more passionate and motivated than I ever was.

    What's individual and important, I think, is the timeline in which this happens. You may well find yourself being inspired as heck one day, for no apparent reason, or you may not, but I think the advice to pause is sound, and then you'll have to figure out when and if you need a kick in the rear to get going again, and when you do I'll happily provide it.

    You seem like a really good guy, and I'm sure you'll get all of this sorted out in time.

    - Thomas
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  4. #14
    ambaker's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Missouri, US
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    504
    Lee,

    I am not familiar with your photographic interests, but do understand your feelings. As I age, and my mobility decreases, I find it frustrating at times. But what I have found, for me, is that I find the process more important than the subject. Not that the images are unimportant, far from it. But, that I can lose myself in the moment. To cease to think about my cares and situation, as I photograph. I find that I can find interesting images in my own yard. No, not grand vistas, but images I would like to capture and work with. More importantly it becomes an enjoyable challenge to find images on this smaller scale.

    Choosing the light, the exposure, the depth of field, works the same for a bug, a flower, a tree, or a mountain. Suddenly I no longer think about what is past, or what is fading. I am in the moment, and doing something I thoroughly enjoy. For me, it is good therapy and more than enough.

    Hopefully you will find your mojo...



    ---
    I am here: http://maps.google.com/maps?ll=36.790798,-90.481149

  5. #15
    markbarendt's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Ignacio, CO, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    5,596
    Blog Entries
    3
    Images
    19
    Well one thing to try is being social while shooting, hang out with other people who are taking pictures.

    Camera club field trips, seminars, workshops, whatever.

    It doesn't even need to be subjects you would normally shoot, in fact that's part of the magic. Whenever I do this I come back with something fun, no exception.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  6. #16
    daleeman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Dayton, Ohio
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    999
    Images
    17
    Quote Originally Posted by ambaker View Post
    ... Suddenly I no longer think about what is past, or what is fading. I am in the moment, and doing something I thoroughly enjoy. For me, it is good therapy and more than enough.

    Hopefully you will find your mojo...

    ---
    I am here: http://maps.google.com/maps?ll=36.790798,-90.481149
    Wow, this is very true. While I have been wrapped up with all things mom and dad I am not living in the moment. For as my concept of photographygoes it is always been about being in the moment, it is there that one can really see.

    Yes I too am finding my own mobility is less than I would like it. Certainly hope to be as mobile as I can for as long as I can. Please enjoy all the mobility and adventure in all ways (good advice for me too)

  7. #17
    Toffle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Point Pelee, ON, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,793
    Images
    121
    Lee, my thoughts are with you. It is difficult enough to face the immediate days ahead without thinking of carrying on with your passion for photography. I do not doubt that it still exists, but other concerns will make it difficult to find time or energy for any sort of self indulgence for some time. You have received excellent advice and support so far, so there is little I can add. I will say, however that you do need to take time for yourself, either with a camera or without. You need to indulge your needs in some small way.

    It may be the furthest thing from your mind, but you should check out Philip Toledano's Days With my Father. Philip created a moving tribute to his father while caring for his own physical, mental and emotional health in difficult days. I am sure it was a difficult thing to undertake, but the result is a stunning portrait of love and life.

    Kind regards,
    Tom
    Tom, on Point Pelee, Canada

    Ansel Adams had the Zone System... I'm working on the points system. First I points it here, and then I points it there...

    http://tom-overton-images.weebly.com


  8. #18

    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Central Illinois
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    662
    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    Are either of your parents well enough to still get some enjoyment from those photographs? If so, just looking at some of the photos with them may lessen the burden and refresh your photo mojo.
    I agree with Matt on this one. Not to mention, that if they can id the people in the photos and you record it somehow, it will preserve this information for future generations.

    ME Super

  9. #19
    lesm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    South Australia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    104
    As others have suggested, Lee, now may be the time for you to just go with what's in front of you, one day at a time. If it doesn't feel right to be taking photos, don't take photos. It'll all come back with renewed passion when the time's right. However, could I suggest - and I hope you don't find this indelicate - that perhaps you could take lots of photos of your parents. From what you're saying, they have limited time to enjoy their lives with you and now might be a very good time to have a camera with you when you go and visit them. I remember a newspaper article many years ago about a photographer whose husband was dying of cancer. She took hundreds of shots of him throughout his illness and even after he'd died. People were shocked but I think it was a beautiful thing to do. It was her way of dealing with the emotional turmoil of losing the one she loved. Photography was a strength she had that she didn't have to think too much about but which got her out of her head for a while (and left her with some wonderful images after he'd died).

    Is this something that has any appeal to you, I wonder?

  10. #20
    lesm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    South Australia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    104
    I just wanted to add that one of the things I love about this forum is the atmosphere of trust that's generated, to the extent that people like Lee can feel confident of support when it's asked for, not just in photography related matters but in very personal issues too.

Page 2 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin