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  1. #21
    Worker 11811's Avatar
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    First off, I do wave actual guns around: AR-15s, Glocks, hunting rifles and target guns.
    I carry them in my car. I wear them in holsters. I do it legally and without any sense of trepidation.
    My neighbors see me carrying guns to and from my car on a regular basis. Nobody has ever even asked me about my guns. I have never had any trouble with cops or security guards or anybody else.
    Part of the reason I seem so smug about this is because I feel confident that, if there is some kind of trouble that puts me in danger or puts my family or anybody else around me in harm's way, I have the tools necessary to stop that threat quickly and with reasonable security that innocent people won't get hurt accidentally.

    I have the right to do this and, within the bounds of local regulation, every other law abiding American has the same right. There's no reason anybody should be ashamed of using a gun for any legal purpose.

    Second, it's not my responsibility to worry about whether some idiot mistakes a light meter for a gun. It barely, remotely looks like a gun. Like others have said, there are video cameras that appear more gun-like that a Pentax light meter. Nobody worries about whether people will mistake those video cameras for guns.

    I just can't spend my life looking over my shoulder to see if some stupid person is grabbing at straws.

    It is law enforcement's responsibility to determine if a person is an actual threat. That is a responsibility that they should take very seriously. It is a responsibility that we should MAKE them take very seriously. Running around like scaredy cats is no way to make our government live up to its responsibility. We, as a group, need to hold their feet to the fire and call them out when they do wrong.

    That's all I'm saying.

    I'm not going to go running around town waving anything around, whether it looks like a gun or not, in such a way that is going to scare people.
    If somebody has a question, they can come up to me and politely ask me. I'll be glad to tell them anything they want to know. I'll hand them a business card and tell them to call me if they want me to take photographs for them and I'll give them a good price.

    If I am in a public place, minding my own business, not breaking any laws or hurting anybody, if somebody doesn't have something nice to say to me, I EXPECT to be left alone.
    To the extent of my ability, I will do my best to extend that same courtesy to other people, as well.
    Randy S.

    In girum imus nocte et consumimur igni.

    -----

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/randystankey/

  2. #22
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Worker 11811 View Post
    The stock response should be, "I'm sorry, officer, is there something wrong?" The next question should be, "Do you think I'm breaking the law?" If the answer is anything other than the affirmative, the next response would be, "Excuse me, officer, but I'm busy and I must be going, now."
    Simarlarly, in the UK, the suggestion is to ask an officer "are you detaining me?" If the answer is "no", you can move on. Luckily we don't have to worry about private citizens or cops with guns*.

    (* well, just a few in special cases)


    Steve.
    "People who say things won't work are a dime a dozen. People who figure out how to make things work are worth a fortune" - Dave Rat.

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by ntenny View Post
    I'm really confused about how you mean for this to apply to the situation where somebody thinks you're waving a gun around. This all makes sense if you're talking about the common situation where a cop or rent-a-cop tries to intimidate a photographer out of taking pictures, but I don't think that's really the OP's concern here.

    Not to be a jerk about it, but people get killed this way---by carrying around things that look remotely like guns, and then not being deemed by a responding LEO to be sufficiently compliant. Look at it from the officer's perspective---damn, that guy (apparently) has a deadly weapon, and he refuses to drop it! They are, in general, *allowed* to shoot you under those circumstances, because they are in a position to believe, genuinely and reasonably, that you may be about to shoot them first. (Why else would you refuse to drop your gun, right?)

    I'm not saying it's right, I'm just saying that insisting on keeping the moral high ground, in the very particular situation where something has been mistaken for a gun, is a pretty good way to end up being right but dead.

    -NT
    There was a fairly recent incident in the U.K when a guy who was a known criminal was seen on CCTV by the police carrying an item in the street about three and a half feet long wrapped in newspaper he was confronted by a police armed response team who ended up shooting him dead, unfortunately when they unwrapped the "firearm" it was found to be a table leg !
    Ben

  4. #24
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    A trip to the hardware store for some red or orange or yellow cloth tape or vinyl tape, applied as a 'ring' around the front edge of the spotmeter lens might be appropriate, if you are truly worried about the meter being mistaken as a gun. After all, kids' toy guns have similarly colored tips on them and they are made to resemble real guns.

  5. #25
    Worker 11811's Avatar
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    That's a good idea on several levels, actually. Marking with colored tape is a good way of identifying your gear.
    If something gets lost, stolen or just mixed up with somebody else's gear, it's a good way to keep tabs on your stuff.
    Randy S.

    In girum imus nocte et consumimur igni.

    -----

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/randystankey/

  6. #26
    Roger Cole's Avatar
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    I have a Soligor. The only people I've ever had comment that it looked like a gun - well, only one person, who didn't confuse it just commented - don't know a damned thing about guns. Of course I grew up in rural east Tennessee where EVERYONE owns guns and is familiar with them. A gun is not used held very close to the eye like that (not unless you want to put your eye out as well as shoot.)

  7. #27
    Worker 11811's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Cole View Post
    Of course I grew up in rural east Tennessee where EVERYONE owns guns and is familiar with them.
    Same goes for Pennsyltucky.
    Randy S.

    In girum imus nocte et consumimur igni.

    -----

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/randystankey/

  8. #28
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    Haven't had that problem with the Pentax spot meter, although an officer confided that I almost got it when I walked up to the gate with an Uzi black Bogen tripod with pan/tilt head with big rubber levers and legs retracted. He said that out of the corner of his eye it looked exactly like some very specific sort of assault weapon. Probably didn't help that I walked up carrying it horizontally.

  9. #29
    eddie's Avatar
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    My camera bag is often stopped ( in the x-ray machine) while I'm heading to board a plane. When it happens, it's always to get a closer look at my Pentax DSM. They always tell me they know it's not a gun, but that it resembles certain types of tasers.

  10. #30
    benjiboy's Avatar
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    My spot meter is a Kenko KFM 2100 ( formally the Minolta Auto meter V1) that doesn't look like a gun and is much more versatile and cheaper than a Pentax Digital Spot meter http://www.shutterbug.com/content/ke...meter-and-more, I have currently have three digital meters and have had in the fifty odd years I've been a photographer many of the best meters made, but this is the best I've ever had.
    Last edited by benjiboy; 02-17-2012 at 09:07 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    Ben

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