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  1. #11
    Leigh B's Avatar
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    One good solution to potential binding is to use filters with brass rings rather than aluminum.

    The binding problem arises when you have an aluminum part threaded into another aluminum part, as happens with most filters.

    B+W and Heliopan make brass-ring filters. There may be other companies. I use B+W filters.

    - Leigh

    nb B+W is a German company, not to be confused with b&w (erroneously B&W), which refers to flack and white photography.
    “Wise men talk because they have something to say; fools, because they have to say something.” - Plato

  2. #12
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
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    A UV filter is more commonly used as a lens protector. It's visible effect is negligible in practice, unlike the Skylight 1B filter which is noticeably pink and helps tone down excessive blue in landscape photography. UV filters have no effect indoors.

    A drop (just a drop) of Finish Line bicycle chain lubricant (contains teflon) on filter threads known to be difficult to remove (some polarisers, including B+W) will be a godsend. Filter wrenches impart extra force on the thread and are best avoided entirely. If a filter is difficult to remove, it has been secured too tightly — and that is NOT necessary. I have watched photographers literally monkey-wrench a filter on, then stripping the lens thread! Boo-hoo.

    Any filter, not just B+W and/or Hoya, can bind to a lens thread. A related but far more serious problem is lenses with aspheric front elements which can contact a filter once it is screwed in. Early on as a photographer you need to be aware of this, especially as you procure more expensive lenses. I need not tell you what happens if a critical front element is careless enough to suffer abrasive contact from a filter. The test for it is to put a cut section of lens cleaning tissue on the front element then very slowly screw the filter in and observe clearance. If the sheet moves, that's it: the filter is no good.
    .::Gary Rowan Higgins

    A comfort zone is a wonderful place. But nothing ever grows there.
    —Anon.






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