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  1. #1
    msbarnes's Avatar
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    Filter Questions

    I'm beginning to experiment with filters. I do not understand his topic fully but I have a few general questions. I shoot B&W primarily and with contrast filters but...

    -There is no negative consequence of using UV filters indoors, right? I mean besides the general consequences for putting an additional glass in front of your lens..flare..image degradation, etc. The intent of the UV filter is solely for protection.

    -I have invested in some Hoya HMC filters, but I've read that they can sometimes bind to lenses. To those who have experienced this issue, were you able to safely remove your filter?

  2. #2
    fotch's Avatar
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    Many brands can sometimes bind to the lens. I picked up a filter wrench from a camera store years ago and it does come in handy every once in a while. It looks sort of like an oil filter wrench except its made of plastic is smaller, of course. Cheap insurance.
    Items for sale or trade at www.Camera35.com

  3. #3
    DWThomas's Avatar
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    I have rubbed a tiny bit of candle wax on the thread, at maybe three spots around the perimeter, before screwing it in. That's with the idea of providing a bit of lubrication that is likely stay pretty much in the threads and not migrate much. If you screw together brand new filters in anodized aluminum frames, you can feel a certain gritty friction, the smidgeon of wax helps relieve that.

    My 2¢,

    DaveT

  4. #4

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    You might also try removing the filter while wearing a rubber kitchen glove. Sometimes that will give a better grip. Be sure to carefully put the filter on to begin with and don't over tighten.

    http://www.jeffreyglasser.com/

  5. #5

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    The first four items here are filter wrenches for removing stuck filters from lenses or for separating filters from each other. They’re sold in pairs to separate two filters stuck together.

    http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/search...tialSearch=yes

    You can also use a toothpick to apply a tiny amount of petrolatum to the filter threads before installing the filter on the lens to help prevent the filter from getting stuck in the first place.

    Here is a wax specifically intended for lubricating metal.

    http://www.sinclairintl.com/.aspx/pi...perial-Die-Wax
    Last edited by Ian C; 02-16-2012 at 01:28 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  6. #6

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    One reason that it can be difficult to remove a filter is that when you grasp the filter ring with your fingers, you apply some distortion to its shape, and create the resistance yourself. Try opening your hand out flat, and stiffen your fingers to create a tight stretch of skin across your palm. Then apply the flat of your hand to the front of the filter ring and twist in the same direction you would other wise. It has always worked for me, comes off surprisingly easily, and no extra tool to keep track of. The only thing you have to keep in mind is that if your hand isn't taught enough, you might leave a palm print on the filter, but this is easy to avoid just by being careful where and how you apply your hand.
    I do like the wax idea, but have never liked anything oily being around the glass. Too easy to transfer in the carrying case.

  7. #7

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    Back in my 35mm days I used Leica lenses/filters and read a Leitz recommendation that it's easy to remove a stuck filter by using the thumb & index finger to pinch the filter rim at one location and turn. Seemed obvious this was to avoid distorting its round shape into an oval, creating additional friction on the threads. So, I've always used this technique and it's always worked. It's likely that all threaded filters have rims that protrude from the glass far enough to grasp in this manner.

  8. #8

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    Many people use a UV as protection. It does block UV light from reaching the film. "UV can appear as reduced clarity and the appearance of haze"*
    "ideal filter to be left on the lens as protection"*

    *B+W filter catalog.
    Heavily sedated for your protection.

  9. #9
    Leigh B's Avatar
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    One simple way to remove a stuck filter is with a flat rubber mat on the desk or counter.

    Put the lens face down on the mat so the entire filter ring is in contact, then turn the lens body while applying downward pressure.

    - Leigh
    “Wise men talk because they have something to say; fools, because they have to say something.” - Plato

  10. #10
    Martin Aislabie's Avatar
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    Filters very rarely bind onto Lenses if you just nip them onto your lens in the first place.

    I use a multi-coated filter of some description all the time on all of my lenses.

    Filters keep sticky fingers as well as dirt and rain off the front element of lenses.

    If you use a clean multi-coated filter there is very little chance of it creating flare.

    When you experiment with the various coloured filters available to you with B&W film - take notes of what you are doing. Its very easy to shoot rolls and rolls of film and them not have a clue what filters you used for any particular shot (or at least its what I did)

    Exactly what filters you settle on will depend on what you like to photograph and where in the world you are (geographical location has a significant affect on the quality of the light)

    Martin

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