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  1. #1
    sterioma's Avatar
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    Suggestions for buying a loupe

    Hi,

    I would like to buy a loupe to evaluate my negatives/slides (35mm).

    I am not sure which magnification factor I should be looking for: 4x/5x/10x?

    Suggestions?

    -Stefano

  2. #2
    sparx's Avatar
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    I have a 4x magnification loupe which seems more than enough for me. I suppose it's dependant on how much detail you want.
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  3. #3
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    I agree. It is a mistake to go for the biggest magnification. You wind up seeing just the grain or ground glass texture instead of the image. 4x has always worked best for me.
    That is called grain. It is supposed to be there.
    =Neal W.=

  4. #4
    tbm
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    I only shoot 35mm film, and for standard viewing of my self-processed negatives I use a sharp, vignetting-free Schneider 4x loupe with my lightbox. However, I find it essential to also use my Schneider 10x loupe to truly determine how sharp my shots are before I attempt to print them. I say this because some times I've printed a negative after viewing it with my 4x only and have seen on the print that it is not sharp afterall. Thus, my 10x confirms via previewing that that which I choose to print is worth printing in terms of acceptable sharpness. I recommend that you bring a negative or a slide to your chosen retailer and try the various loupes they have in stock, because quality varies from manufacturer to manufacturer.

  5. #5
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    4x is pretty common in the publishing world and something in the 4x-6x range is usually a good choice for 35mm

    10x or more is handy for checking sharpness, if you want to decide whether to make a big enlargement.

    Whatever you decide, don't skimp on a loupe. Those cheap plastic 8x Agfa-type loupes will tell you less about your slides and will cause more eye strain than a high-quality 4x loupe. I use a Schneider 4x. If you don't have the budget for a Schneider or Rodenstock, the Peak loupes and the Pentax 5.5X have good reputations.
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  6. #6
    Dave Parker's Avatar
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    One of the best loupes I have is actually a finger print analyzer that I got out of an estate that I liquidated for a law professor, sharp, no distortion and about 8x, really allows you to see sharpness and I also use for my fine focus on large format, they normlly run about 10 bucks now if you can find one, but is beats my $200.00 Rodenstock, I love it.

    Dave Parker
    Ground Glass Specialties

  7. #7

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    I use an 8x but then my eyes are aging faster than I am. As Dave says it really shows the sharp ones from the dreaded missed ones.

  8. #8

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    I've been using a calumet loupe for a couple of years and have not had any eye strain problems at all. they are pretty cheap too. Cheap and good is a bonus in my book.
    Technological society has succeeded in multiplying the opportunities for pleasure, but it has great difficulty in generating joy. Pope Paul VI

    So, I think the "greats" were true to their visions, once their visions no longer sucked. Ralph Barker 12/2004

  9. #9
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    I have used 4x and 8x loupes before. The one I like best is a Peak 4X. Very good loupe at a good price point, covers the entire area for a 35mm slide, although I do move it around while analyzing the slides.
    Cheers, Shesh

    Not to know what happened before one was born is always to be a child - Cicero

  10. #10

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    For an inexpensive loupe that has great quality, take your 50mm lens off the camera turn it upside down and use it. I'm not sure what magnification it gives... (my guess is around 4x)

    Like anything, you usually get what you pay for... Look at it as an investment.

    joe

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