Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,926   Posts: 1,585,139   Online: 884
      
Page 6 of 9 FirstFirst 123456789 LastLast
Results 51 to 60 of 88
  1. #51
    fotch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    SE WI- USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,230
    Quote Originally Posted by MaximusM3 View Post
    ....Does that imply that 35mm is a "joke" format just play around with? ULF.....
    I think it is because of how many pictures fit on a roll. The tendency is to take way more pictures than if you were shooting sheet film. Certainly, a 36x roll can be an advantage, in certain situations. Some of the Pros would shoot with a long roll attachment to their pro camera. However, for most anything else, not needed. But what do you do if you have 36x, wait? Not likely. Get a motor drive, burn through that roll. Lots of pictures, not much thought to taking them.

    If you load you own 35mm, try 12x loads or even less, then you will think about what you are doing, much the way you have to, in large format. JMHO
    Items for sale or trade at www.Camera35.com

  2. #52
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Minnesota
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    14,560
    Images
    300
    I've abandoned all sheet film shooting for a few years now, because the format and shooting style never allowed me to get what I wanted in the print. It's way too slow for how I work, and I basically don't find it fun to set up a shot for minutes, agonizing over minute details while I could just advance to the next frame while looking through the viewfinder, actually able to see what I'm capturing before the shutter is released. 35mm and roll film represents true freedom of photography to me, and sheet film more or less feels like a straitjacket by comparison. That's MY world, guys. We're all entitled to our preferences.

    My favorite formats are 35mm and 6x6. In my world I actually get better print quality from 35mm than I do 120, because it gives me more texture, grain, and substance to support the subject matter and the mood that I am after in almost all of my photography than does the 120 format. While I still love my Hasselblad camera, I more often go to 35mm because I just like what I end up with in the print more. Both camera types have beautiful lenses that help me draw wonderful pictures (for me) and I love them both.
    If these cameras continue to work as serviced, and film continues to be available, I see no reason to ever switch.

    And, for the record, print size is not a consideration here. I print largish prints from 35mm, and the same analogy is true as for small prints, with getting what I like. Often I don't even think too much about the print quality even, just knowing it'll be good enough. Instead I just have the freedom to point the camera where I'd like to point it, and within a split second am ready to release the shutter, or to continually re-frame the shot as the subject matter moves in front of me.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  3. #53

    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Enroute
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,004
    Quote Originally Posted by fotch View Post
    I think it is because of how many pictures fit on a roll. The tendency is to take way more pictures than if you were shooting sheet film. Certainly, a 36x roll can be an advantage, in certain situations. Some of the Pros would shoot with a long roll attachment to their pro camera. However, for most anything else, not needed. But what do you do if you have 36x, wait? Not likely. Get a motor drive, burn through that roll. Lots of pictures, not much thought to taking them.

    If you load you own 35mm, try 12x loads or even less, then you will think about what you are doing, much the way you have to, in large format. JMHO
    If you work that way, then yes. I have put up to 20 rolls a day through a Leica M3, Nikon F100 or FM3a. Or, when I am busy shooting a lot of digi and medium format, a roll can take a month to go through, but I use just as much thought and care with 35mm as any other format. If I am shooting TP in my XPan, then I use a tripod, make sure everything is good. But if I have Tri-X in my M3, pretty much the only Leica I have left and the only film I use in it, then the shooting style is different, more fluid, loose.

    I find that the combo of 35mm, 35mm pano and 6x6 leaves me wanting for nothing more and I will make a 30" wide print from 35mm Tri-X just as I would from a 120mm Techpan neg.
    "I'm the freak that shoots film. God bless the freaks!" ~ Mainecoonmaniac ~

  4. #54
    MaximusM3's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    NY
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    756
    Images
    6
    Quote Originally Posted by fotch View Post
    I think it is because of how many pictures fit on a roll. The tendency is to take way more pictures than if you were shooting sheet film. Certainly, a 36x roll can be an advantage, in certain situations. Some of the Pros would shoot with a long roll attachment to their pro camera. However, for most anything else, not needed. But what do you do if you have 36x, wait? Not likely. Get a motor drive, burn through that roll. Lots of pictures, not much thought to taking them.

    If you load you own 35mm, try 12x loads or even less, then you will think about what you are doing, much the way you have to, in large format. JMHO
    Could be, but it's very personal really. I load my own with 10 frames and a lot of times develop a 36 roll with only 3-4 frames if they are important. Of course, the tendency to take more is natural but, depending on subject matter, it is also advisable and that is a freedom that sheet film just doesn't offer. I'm not a tripod/landscape guy 99% of time so I live in a different world, I guess. Most of my "serious" work is with 35mm and I print as large as 16x20. No complaints yet

  5. #55

    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Enroute
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,004
    Could not have said it better my self. I just find that shooting square format and being able to swap backs in a split second makes the Blad my tool of choice for at least 70% of my work on film. In photographing for over 35 years, this is the happiest I have ever been.

    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Bertilsson View Post
    I've abandoned all sheet film shooting for a few years now, because the format and shooting style never allowed me to get what I wanted in the print. It's way too slow for how I work, and I basically don't find it fun to set up a shot for minutes, agonizing over minute details while I could just advance to the next frame while looking through the viewfinder, actually able to see what I'm capturing before the shutter is released. 35mm and roll film represents true freedom of photography to me, and sheet film more or less feels like a straitjacket by comparison. That's MY world, guys. We're all entitled to our preferences.

    My favorite formats are 35mm and 6x6. In my world I actually get better print quality from 35mm than I do 120, because it gives me more texture, grain, and substance to support the subject matter and the mood that I am after in almost all of my photography than does the 120 format. While I still love my Hasselblad camera, I more often go to 35mm because I just like what I end up with in the print more. Both camera types have beautiful lenses that help me draw wonderful pictures (for me) and I love them both.
    If these cameras continue to work as serviced, and film continues to be available, I see no reason to ever switch.

    And, for the record, print size is not a consideration here. I print largish prints from 35mm, and the same analogy is true as for small prints, with getting what I like. Often I don't even think too much about the print quality even, just knowing it'll be good enough. Instead I just have the freedom to point the camera where I'd like to point it, and within a split second am ready to release the shutter, or to continually re-frame the shot as the subject matter moves in front of me.
    "I'm the freak that shoots film. God bless the freaks!" ~ Mainecoonmaniac ~

  6. #56
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Minnesota
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    14,560
    Images
    300
    Quote Originally Posted by fotch View Post
    But what do you do if you have 36x, wait? Not likely. Get a motor drive, burn through that roll. Lots of pictures, not much thought to taking them.
    It's understood that this is opinion only, but it sure does highlight shooting style, doesn't it? And, I'd like to point out that to put 'thought' into photographs may not always be successful. It could be just as important to react on instinct, emotion, or sudden inclinations.

    This thread highlights that there are many ways to practice photography, with many preferences regarding outcome. Some love and embrace grain, and some fight tooth and nail to eliminate it. Some are wholly interested in subject matter, and others are into ultimate print quality. And there is probably a little of all types in each and every one of us, just more or less dominant.
    Only one thing is for certain, we are all different and have different inclinations.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  7. #57
    jscott's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    PNW
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    84
    I have no problem with 2x3 sheets and 620 and 127 rolls, and some of my favorite older cameras use those formats.
    For 2x3 sheets I got a holder that fits into a steel 35mm daylight tank. Makes everything real easy.

    Least used? 35 mm and 5x7.
    Except that sometimes I put 35 mm in 127 and 120 cameras.

  8. #58
    Roger Cole's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Suburbs of Atlanta, GA USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,212
    By 2x3 do you mean 2.25x3.25? Won't the Jobo sheet film reels take this size? I know mine have settings for, and the snap in panels on the 2509n reels marked with, 6x9 cm.

  9. #59
    cjbecker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    IN
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    779
    Images
    19
    35mm for me. I tried my hardest to shoot it and it just did not work out. I really admire people who shoot it because there are people making great images in that format, but its just not the way I shoot. I also hate having that many pictures per roll. I like having no more then 12 per roll and my favorite is 1 per sheet.

  10. #60
    markbarendt's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Beaverton, OR, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    5,796
    Blog Entries
    3
    Images
    19
    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Bertilsson View Post
    It's understood that this is opinion only, but it sure does highlight shooting style, doesn't it? And, I'd like to point out that to put 'thought' into photographs may not always be successful. It could be just as important to react on instinct, emotion, or sudden inclinations.
    Style is huge and I do agree that lots of thought and fuss doesn't always generate better shots, but neither does volume.

    When I started shooting digital for money 100,000 shots in a year was pretty normal, silly but normal. Essentially 1 to sell and a 199 to make the sitter feel like a modle and me feel confident.

    After a few years of that the volume started falling precipitously, experience allowed me to skip 99% of shot I used to take.

    A roll of 120 is now enough for 5 poses with a spare negative for each pose.

    This is as you say a matter of style and I would suggest subject matter choice.

    At 10 frames per hour I have the time to talk with and enjoy my subjects company and find the 1-shot I want.
    Mark Barendt, Beaverton, OR

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin



 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin