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  1. #11
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mr rusty View Post
    the chief of the police media advisory group has made it clear in public memos, that photography is unrestricted in public places. http://tinyurl.com/d6xmucn
    And remember that in whichever country you happen to be in, there are millions of pictures taken every day with no problems which are not reported in the newspapers or on TV.


    Steve.

  2. #12

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    There is this old guy usually sitting on the steps going up to Basilique de Sacre Coeur, feeding sparrows. He really don't like it when you take his picture. If you are going to take specific pictures of a person, always ask. No matter where you are.
    Also, taking pictures of police is never a good idea. It's a free country, yes, but that goes both ways.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steven L View Post

    Also, taking pictures of police is never a good idea.
    Why not?

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by brucemuir View Post
    Why not?
    I a sense, I can understand why people would photograph coppers in the UK, because of their cool hats.

    How ever, my impression is that if you do photograph the police, they may be irritated and start harassing you, asking why you are taking photos of security personnel and such.
    - It's probably legal though.

    I have photographed the police in my own town, Oslo, when Obama came over to get his debated peace price, the whole city was full of heavily armed cops, quite a sight.
    I've also photographed demonstrators and the police, but I suspect it is very important to stand in a place, where there is no doubt that you are not taking part in the demonstration in any way and be very visible while photographing. (I always make sure I use my white big-ass Canon 70-200 F2.8 L when I do that, as they simply assume that I am photographing for a paper or something )
    -
    "Nice picture, you must have an amazing camera."
    Visit my photography blog at: http://helino-photo.blogspot.com

  5. #15
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Helinophoto View Post
    It's probably legal though.
    It is.


    Steve.

  6. #16

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    The RCMP in Toronto didn't mind his picture taken. Than again, he was on a horse with traditional clothes, with hat and all. More like a photographic opportunity than an actual policeman. No offence to the RCMP.

  7. #17
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    The story I'd heard about photographing in Paris was the whole "using a tripod=professional" thing. If you're not using a tripod, it's definitely not an issue. If you are, just be prepared to A: act the dumb tourist, and B: be able to explain in broken French that you're just an amateur on vacation. Be humble, polite, and apologetic. Dumb American plays much better than Ugly American. I've ended up having some very lovely conversations with policemen who've come up to me to ask what I'm doing when out shooting with a view camera. If you are shooting with a view camera, one of the surest ways to get rid of an overzealous cop who hassles you about what you're doing, not only be enthusiastic in explaining it, but offer to let them take a look under the darkcloth! If they're not a fellow hobbyist, they'll run screaming the other direction and leave you alone. If they are also a photographer, they'll take you up on it and you'll have made a new friend.

  8. #18

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    You could be right about "tripod=professional" but also "professional=expensive". I think the police would want to warn you about people who want to take your stuff. A monopod would be less suspicious and easier to transport.

  9. #19
    amsp's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steven L View Post
    Also, taking pictures of police is never a good idea.
    I beg to differ

    Last edited by amsp; 03-27-2012 at 12:17 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by mr rusty View Post
    I have shot many street scenes in London, and never had any sort of problem, ever. There are the occasional stories that over zealous security and occasionally a misguided policeman does sometimes try and prevent photography, but the chief of the police media advisory group has made it clear in public memos, that photography is unrestricted in public places. http://tinyurl.com/d6xmucn
    Is that also true if the chief of the police media advisory group isn't around and they are arresting and/or beating the crap out of someone ?.
    Ben

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