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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by afrank View Post
    Sorry I dont get that last step.
    Sorry for being obtuse. The Synchro Compur used on Rollei and a few other cameras in the 1950 and 1960's had an interlock device on which one could set the EV number and it would lock all aperture-shutter speed combinations from which the photographer could choose. It was intended to be an aid to the photographer. I like it but a lot of folks found it to be annoying.

  2. #12

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    If one doesn't ahve a shutter with an EV interlock, I think the way to read the meter is as follows:

    The image shows EV13. EV13 is defined as... for 100 ASA, 1/60 at f/11. See Table 2 at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Exposure_value

    These settings are seen on your image. 1/60 is next to 100 ASA, and f/11 is next to the EV13.

    If you are using 200 ASA film, see the shutter speed next to 200. Use the same aperture.

    This shutter speed & aperture combination is just a starting point from which you can figure out the combination that best suits your image and shooting conditions. For example: If you need a faster shutter speed you can do that as long as you adjust the aperture accordingly for the same exposure.

  3. #13

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    I'd say this, though... there are certainly easier-to-use light meters on the market!

  4. #14
    Bill Burk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrianShaw View Post
    I'd say this, though... there are certainly easier-to-use light meters on the market!
    Certainly easier to comprehend or more familiar interfaces...

    But how many light meters can you simply look at and read off the f/stop -or- turn it so you simply look at and read off the shutter speed.

    After you spin the dial, you can leave it. You don't even need to touch the meter to push a read button.

  5. #15

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    The ease-of-use of a meter is largely determined by experience using it. When using old meters I much prefer the Luna Pro... but that's simply my preference.

  6. #16

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    After Days of trying still cant get consistent results for low and good light conditions. atm

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrianShaw View Post
    EV13 is defined as... for 100 ASA, 1/60 at f/11..
    EV doesn't need a film speed to be defined as it is just a function of aperture and shutter speed and is not a measure of the light.

    Light Value (LV) however, is a light measurement. at ISO 100 LV = EV.


    Steve.
    "People who say things won't work are a dime a dozen. People who figure out how to make things work are worth a fortune" - Dave Rat.

  8. #18

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    Let's see if we can figute it out:

    Aim the meter at the subject to be photographed.

    The meter needle will move and settle.

    Turn the dial so the f/stop you want to use or the shutter speed you want alignes with the needle.

    Read the shutter speed or, f/stop that alignes with the ASA (ISO) rating of the film you want to use.

    That is it. Nice and simple. The meter works the same as say a Weston III or II or most other selenium meters such as the Pilot/Pilot II or GE PR-2. All are similar in how to use.

    The drawback of the selenium meter is the cell responds better and faster as the light lumens increase. Not a meter for low level use. I used Weston seleniums for quite a few years and if the meter reads right they can be as good as anything out there. I only switched after picking up some CDS cell meters at a bargain price. For better, you can pick up early analog meters using the 625 cell that is no longer available and use an adaptor to use a newer battery. I use a pair that back when made were very well respected by professionals; a Weston Ranger and Metrastar (made by the company that made the external meters for Leica). Each was bought for less than $25 and physically in like new condition and measured within a .25 stop of my Bronica metered prism and each other.

    If you want to keep and use the meter and it is off, try Quality Light Meteric in Hollywood, CA for repairs. He can cut a new cell. He is the go to guy for Westons and does others as well. He maintains the meters for the Hollywood studios so ain't no beginner. I'd have disposed of my Westons but, held onto them thinking of sending them to him to refurb.

  9. #19

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    the best way to use the meter is
    set the dial to the asa / iso value if whatever film you are using

    point and turn the dial .. look at the dial and then

    interpret the dial using this
    http://www.fredparker.com/ultexp1.htm
    silver magnets, trickle tanks sold
    artwork often times sold for charity
    PM me for details

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Smith View Post
    Steve.
    Perhaps technically correct, but "yawn". The OP is asking how to use a light meter and probably isn't interested in technicalities of terms. Thanks, though, for the clarification.
    Last edited by BrianShaw; 04-07-2012 at 01:44 PM. Click to view previous post history.

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