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  1. #11
    Bill Burk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nsurit View Post
    Keep it in your bag until you are ready to use it. Clean it up when you are home. UV filter.
    This is the recurring theme.

    What I do... My "bag" (designed for backpacking) is a modified REI pack pocket. The camera goes in a foam-padded pouch, inside a home-made Cuben sack, inside a Mylar turkey bag.

    So I could (and did) go down Bigfoot Rapids at Knott's Berry Farm with the pack and not fear it getting wet (I did fear just a little but I didn't have to).

    The only thing I'd add to the water-resistant bag for carrying to and from the scene, is a temporary sack or bag that you can put over the camera on the tripod (assumes you use a tripod) on the days you actually are photographing during a storm involving rain/wind/sand. And some kind of towel to wipe the immediate water off.

  2. #12

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    Galveston? Isn't there a pretty good chance that Sonic was under water at one time or another?

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mainecoonmaniac View Post
    I've heard that if you drop you camera in sea water, the best thing to do is to take the camera and put it in a bucket of fresh water before you take it to a repair facility. The fresh water will help some of the salt migrate out of the camera. I'm assuming that's one of those old all-mechanical cameras.
    I'd call my insurance agent and start shopping for a replacement. So said the retired insurance agent. Bill Barber

  4. #14

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    I make a point of wiping all exposed parts of my camera gear with a silicone-infused gun and reel cloth after any exposure to a salt environment. Look for one in the gun cleaning supplies section of a big sporting goods store. This provides some small measure of cleaning and protection to the most exposed surfaces. (Makes the gear look nice and spiffy, too!)

    I usually have a yellow or other filter on the lens when working at the coast, so salty mist on the lens elements is not a big concern. I do clean the lens carefully if I've been working without the filter. Just breathe on the front element after a walk on the beach, and you'll see tiny spots of dried moisture. I breathe on it again and wipe it clean. As someone said in a previous post, sand is the real danger.

    Peter Gomena

  5. #15
    Bill Burk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pgomena View Post
    I make a point of wiping all exposed parts of my camera gear with a silicone-infused gun and reel cloth after any exposure to a salt environment. Look for one in the gun cleaning supplies section of a big sporting goods store. This provides some small measure of cleaning and protection to the most exposed surfaces. (Makes the gear look nice and spiffy, too!)

    I usually have a yellow or other filter on the lens when working at the coast, so salty mist on the lens elements is not a big concern. I do clean the lens carefully if I've been working without the filter. Just breathe on the front element after a walk on the beach, and you'll see tiny spots of dried moisture. I breathe on it again and wipe it clean. As someone said in a previous post, sand is the real danger.

    Peter Gomena
    Good advice, but... cleaning lenses at the beach is where all cleaning marks come from (not precisely true but you know what I mean)...

    On location, I'd daub off water but not rub. Clean carefully at home after the trip, making sure all sand is off before rubbing the lens with anything.

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by ChristopherCoy View Post
    We live on the gulf coast. And today we spent the day in Galveston, and when we were leaving we stopped at a sonic for something to drink. I noticed the speakers and all the iron work was rusted. That's when I realized it was all the salt water.

    I'd like to go back and photograph things including the beach, but I absolutely do not want to put my Hassy in danger.

    Any recommendations for protecting it? Trash bag maybe?
    Here you go, these will work just fine.

    http://www.stoprust.com/sacrificial-anodes.htm

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by nsurit View Post
    Keep it in your bag until you are ready to use it. Clean it up when you are home. UV filter. Trick for reducing damage to tripod. PVC pipe with end caps slipped over legs, and attached with duck tape at top will keep sand and water off legs. Galveston? I'd be sure I had all of it insured on a floater policy (inland marine, personal articles policy.) So says the retired insurance agent who lives in Corpus Christi most of the time with his Hasselblad and friends. Bill Barber


    Well the username sure makes sense now!! Lol!!

    Great tip for the tripod.

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