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Thread: Tripod Advice

  1. #11
    mhanc's Avatar
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    I have a really, really inexpensive aluminum tripod (Ambico, I think is the brand). Probably cost less than $20 new. Very light weight and have never wanted anything "better". Perfect for my Rolleiflex. I also use it for my Hasselblad - but at shutter speeds slower than 1/125 I have to put the mirror up and open the back curtain before firing the shutter, otherwise the vibration blurs the image - I would think this a problem with other tripods as well.

    In my experience, you can get 99% of the functionality you want with this type of tripod... and spend the significant savings on film or whatever.

    And, as mentioned by Jeff, get quick release plates. Especially the one made by Rollei for your Rolleidlex - as the back can be damaged when screwed directly into the tripod. Also, it is just way more easy.
    Last edited by mhanc; 09-02-2012 at 10:15 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  2. #12
    Jim Jones's Avatar
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    Unlike many of today's cameras, a good tripod can be a lifetime investment. This means tripods made decades ago can be today's best buys. I have several tripods, from quite large to tiny, but amost always use old Tiltall tripods, and keep one in the car and one in the house. The Tiltall is suitable for 4x5 view and any smaller cameras. Newer tripods may have a few features lacking in the Tiltall, such as quick release plates and levers to lock leg extension. I consider neither feature to be an advantage when performance and durability is preferred over convenience.

  3. #13

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    Jim, I've never been able to justify a Tiltall from any of the makers who've used the trade name but have a Star-D imitation Tiltall that I bought in the late '70s. It is a very good imitation.

    The Star-D went in the closet when I started shooting movies and thought I needed a fluid head. It stays in the closet because I've found that nearly all tripods with tubular legs and compression type leg locks, including my Star D and the Bogen 3021 that replaced it, aren't particularly stiff in torsion. This is a problem with long lenses.

    IMO a wood tripod like the Berlebach 8023 that replaced the 3021 is preferable because they have larger bearing surfaces between the leg sections than tripods with tubular legs. I recently lucked into an ancient Ries Model C that's very nice, can't recommend new Ries tripods because of price. Used ones -- mine cost all of $30 -- can be good propositions.

  4. #14
    cliveh's Avatar
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    I sometimes use a Manfrotto 190X with a Hasselblad and find it fine.

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

  5. #15
    amsp's Avatar
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    I recently bought a BENRO A2691TB1 and I'm extremely happy with it. It almost seems like an impossible combination but it's light, very sturdy and quite reasonably priced. It also folds up very compact and is quick to open/close. Highly recommended.

  6. #16

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    The 3021 Manfrotto is a good tripod, so is the Tiltall(original made by the Marchioni Bros) the newest ones are nowhere near the same quality.
    The Tiltall has ONLY a pan tilt head and it's not removable. It can be modified, but why bother?

    Information on Gitzo can be found somewhere on Wikipedia here:http://camerapedia.wikia.com/wiki/Gitzo_tripods.
    Gitzo seems to take delight in changing model numbers like people change their socks, I think they do it to torment salespeople.

    Gitzo has models from Series #0 to #5. The differences are in the diameter of the main leg section. The current catalog numbers equate to the old Series model using the first number in the model number ie: 3325 = Series 3 AKA Studex. The most useful for you would be a Series 2 or 3. Within each series you will find different numbers of leg sections. More sections = more compact when folded and fewer = less compact. IMO(!) a Series 3 would be a better choice especially with the 180.
    An added advantage to them is a wider base when their set up and more stable.
    Heavily sedated for your protection.

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