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  1. #1

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    Dec 2012
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    Really discouraged about scanning with my Epson v500 - color/grain problems.

    (first, sorry if this is in the wrong forum!)

    I bought an Epson v500 almost two years ago because I wanted to have more control over how my negatives came out by scanning them myself. I use the Epson Scan software.

    I've always used it on Professional setting at 6400dpi (I know that's unnecessarily high), with the Thumbnail box checked, and with automatic exposure adjustment. I am somewhat satisfied with these results but I always noticed that there was a lot more grain than what I see in other peoples' pictures (even people with the exact same camera/film/scanner, such as this picture: http://www.flickr.com/photos/sealegs...ts/4946605824/). So recently I finally got fed up with what I perceieved as an unusual amount of grain so I started experiementing with different settings on my camera. Lo and behold, I found out what a different experience it is when you DON'T check the Thumbnail. Mostly it is a lot more work, but I noticed that the grain is a lot finer and the picture's texture is just smoother overall.
    Example:
    With thumbnail checked: http://i46.tinypic.com/mimp1.jpg
    Without thumbnail checked: http://i47.tinypic.com/14436l0.jpg

    So, at first I got excited, but there was another problem - the colors are way off, as you can see. I know the process should be: select inside the picture and press the auto exposure, and then increase the selection if you want to get the black borders (which I do). But I always end up with bad colors, no matter what.
    Example:
    With thumbnail: http://i49.tinypic.com/2l9ii4p.jpg
    With thumbnail (post-processed in Lightroom): http://i45.tinypic.com/11t1pg2.jpg
    Without thumbnail: http://i50.tinypic.com/2yn5xna.jpg
    Without thumbnail (post-processed in Lightroom): http://i45.tinypic.com/ivbneb.jpg

    As you can see, even if a post-process the crap out of the "without thumbnail" image, it still doesn't look quite right, color-wise.

    So, my question is, what is your procedure for scanning? Any advice you could offer I would be really grateful for, I am very lost and discouraged about scanning my own negatives... it seems that no matter what I do, I can't get them to both have less grain and correct colors.

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Feb 2012
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    Penfield, NY
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    Quote Originally Posted by Holly K View Post
    I've always used it on Professional setting at 6400dpi (I know that's unnecessarily high)

    You appear to be a 35mm shooter from your profile. Saying 64000 ppi is 'unnecessarily high' says it all! Work we did at Kodak suggests that a 25 megapixel file is pretty much the most you can really expect to get from a 35mm image. This only requires you scan at about 2000 ppi. Resolution overscanning can lead to problems. Try scanning at 2000 ppi and see if you like things better.

  3. #3
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    Jan 2007
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    If you are scanning black & white film, then turn off the ICE. ICE causes the silver to glow.

    Your question would be better served on DPUG.org or hybridphoto.com which are sister websites.
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  4. #4

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    Dec 2012
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    Wow, scanning too high would cause problems??!! I would never have imagined...

    Thank you both!! (and yes, I shoot 35mm, and no, I don't have trouble with b/w, only color)

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Jul 2012
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    North Yorkshire, England
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    Just to put my bit in. I have a Epson V500 too and I scan at 300dpi but set the size of the print I wish to make in the drop down menu. But set one size larger.This doesn't waste any time/effort in scanning and as 300 dpi is what I would use for printing (Not that I do a lot of digital prints anyway).

    I don't think I have ever used a scan of 6400 it just takes too long. I did the same thing when I had a Nikon LS5 film scanner but that was a different ball game anyway.

  6. #6
    dances_w_clouds's Avatar
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    Mar 2008
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    With my V500 doing the b&w negs @ 1200 dpi works well and I can do a few rolls without having to wait too long.

  7. #7

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    Dec 2012
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    Thank you, guys. I've never minded the time thing because I just do other tasks while they scan, but if it's causing my color/grain problems, I will be so happy.

  8. #8
    JBrunner's Avatar
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    Dec 2005
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    Hi Holly, welcome to APUG. We are just about film and darkroom here. Scanning topics are over on our sister site, DPUG.



 

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