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  1. #1

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    Kodak Series V Close-Up "G" Mislabeled?

    I purchased a Kodak Series V filter sold as a "Wratten G Filter". As dark yellow contrast filters (Wratten G) can be hard to come by, I bought it. Turns out it's a macro diopter.

    I'm not contesting it with the seller, since the filter ring itself states "Series V Wratten Filter G". However, the lists and catalogues I've found have listed G as either Orange or a synonym for No. 15 Deep Yellow. As far as I can see, series diopters were 6A and 7A. Is this factory-mislabeled, or perhaps a frankenfilter repair job?

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  2. #2
    brucemuir's Avatar
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    I've seen "Portra" series in +1, +2, +3 for series 6
    wonder who has a kodak wratten book handy


    Beuller, BEULLER

  3. #3

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    It's been suggested that this is actually a Wratten G faded to clear (thanks for the PM!). The through-the-lens shot doesn't show much distinction due to the wide angle of the iPhone camera, but handheld the lens seems to be +1 diopter, and has visible curvature (~.8-1mm concave on the rear, and close the the same convex on the front).

  4. #4
    brucemuir's Avatar
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    i used to but series 6 in lots quite often as I had a few cameras that could take them and I would run into fades, bubbles here and there.
    Afterall I think they may just be a gelatin sandwich. Not sure how they made em.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by brucemuir View Post
    wonder who has a kodak wratten book handy


    Beuller, BEULLER

    My Kodak filter book is too new and doesn't use the letter designations... but the old Kodak PhotoGuide does. "G" in Kodak-speak is Nr 15 deep yellow. The pic in the OP is not deep yellow. For whatever reason that filter probably is no good for use. Fading is a possibility but it takes a lot of light over a long time to fade filters in my experience. It really doesn't matter, though... the filter isn't much good to use.


    I recently bought a lot of Nr 5 and another lot of Nr 6 filters -- about 1/3 of each lot was not good for use anymore. They are very old and it seems to take some picking-and-choosing along with a little buy-only-to-throw-out to get a good set of usable filters.

    And please stop calling me "Bueller".

  6. #6

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    p.s. "G" in some other filter maker's lingo is for 'green'.

  7. #7
    lacavol's Avatar
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    The Wratten G is a deep yellow, darker than the K2 filter. The G has a filter factor of 3 while the K2 has a filter factor of 2 with panchromatic film. I have several of the Series VI and when they fade it is usually in the center and not uniform. There is definately no convex glass. The Portra lenses are the magnifying lenses. Today we call the K2 a No. 8 and the G a No.15.
    There is a difference between a shaky or out-of-focus photograph and a snapshot of clouds and fog banks. —Erwin Schrödinger

  8. #8

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    I guess the final answer is someone along the line had a broken or unused yellow filter, and a mild diopter that had fallen out of its ring, and mated them, then.

  9. #9
    DWThomas's Avatar
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    We're at the edge of my expertise here, but I believe the 6A and 7A designations were sizes of slip-on devices that could be filters or diopters. I (probably still have) a closeup lens for my Brownie Target that I think had a 6A designation, but a quick search shows things on ePrey in original Kodak boxes stating 'Closeup Attachment 6A' and another, 'Cloud Filter 6A', so the 6A is not a fully qualified identifier. Dunno, maybe somebody pried some stuff apart to make one of the nA push-on close-ups into a series filter -- weird! (Which is also annoying because push-on stuff seems to be increasingly rare, hate to think they are being scrapped!)



 

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