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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by sehrgut View Post
    Chill . . . Easy on the Italian guy. I don't think he meant so many shades of derogatory meaning: English is likely his second meaning. In the denotative sense, film is both old (it's been around a while) and declining (fewer practitioners and producers): I'm sure he only meant that, which is a challenge we all face, as shown by the many discussions on related topics here at APUG.

    Resent all you want: the fact is that film is, objectively-speaking, both old and declining.
    thank you! you perfectly understood what I meant! Grazie

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by cliveh View Post
    How do scanners make analogue cameras alive?
    Hi, in the sense that film scanner improves somehow the performance of analogue cameras (more possible applications of its output). Therefore, film scanners make easier and more convenient the use of film technology still nowadays.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by cliveh View Post
    How do scanners make analogue cameras alive?
    For some of us younger folks, it helps. a lot. Admittingly, I do not know if I would have taken part of "analog" (I really hate that word...) photography if this were not available. I know many other photographers would feel the same way. Maybe not the majority but there are some that bank on scanning: professional and hobbyists alike. This age is about digital.

    Ironnically, I want to stop scanning! After wet printing I'm beginning to appreciate what photography is about: prints!

  4. #14

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    I agree with msbarnes: scanning allowed me to get into analogue photography when I otherwise wouldn't have been able to. Without appropriate space for a darkroom, I had the choice to keep using my DSLR as my sole camera, rededicate a large part of my apartment to a hobby I wasn't at that time sure I'd stick with, or scan the negatives.

    I'm ever so glad I decided to scan: especially since improving scan technology means that digital images' resolution is fixed when the photograph is taken, but my photos keep getting better and better resolution as time goes by.

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by msbarnes View Post
    For some of us younger folks, it helps. a lot. Admittingly, I do not know if I would have taken part of "analog" (I really hate that word...) photography if this were not available. I know many other photographers would feel the same way. Maybe not the majority but there are some that bank on scanning: professional and hobbyists alike. This age is about digital.

    Ironnically, I want to stop scanning! After wet printing I'm beginning to appreciate what photography is about: prints!
    Naw... I can get a good-enough color print from that other capture method. Projection's where it's at , and film is better at being projected than digital. For B&W (which I haven't done much of, but am warming up to it slowly), film is definitely more pleasing to my eye than the other capture method followed by post-capture conversion.
    ME Super

    Shoot more film.
    There are eight ways to put a slide into a projector tray. Seven of them are wrong.

  6. #16

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    I would like to participate but I have trouble understand many of your questions.

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chan Tran View Post
    I would like to participate but I have trouble understand many of your questions.
    write me an email and I will reply to you explaining the questions you do not understand

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by sehrgut View Post
    Resent all you want: the fact is that film is, objectively-speaking, both old and declining.
    and so are we
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by RalphLambrecht View Post
    and so are we
    Some of us are just in denial.

  10. #20
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    Hybrid workflows are essential for some of us who do not have space for a darkroom (or a good one at any rate).

    Especially when it comes to color work. When it comes to slides, scanning and projecting are really the only (practical) options left, unless you find someone who has both the material and skill to make a decent ilfochrome. For me, film scanners are really great for proofing, and if I have an image that I love, I print it. But when it comes to color, I just cannot have the set up at this time to wet print RA4. So yes, if it were not for film scanners, many more people would have to use digital out of practical necessity. And even if they didn't, most mini-lab prints are scanned and made digitally anyway. So digital/scanners are still involved. I don't imagine i'm the only one in this situation, so for everyone like me who shoots color, we are slowing the decline of color materials, and contributing to film sales. By extension of this, I would conclude that scanners are in fact, helping film sales.
    www.EASmithV.com

    "The camera is an instrument that teaches people how to see without a camera."— Dorothea Lange
    http://www.flickr.com/easmithv/
    RIP Kodachrome

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