Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,547   Posts: 1,544,524   Online: 1014
      
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 19 of 19
  1. #11

    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    258
    Images
    29
    Thanks for the additional replies Marc B and Peltigera. I'll contact Quality Light Metric just to be safe. If my meter checks out OK, then I know it's a shutter variance.

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    5,064
    There are many factors, a lot of which have been already mentioned, that makes Sunny-16 only approximate. It isn't just shutter variation that will cause what you are experiencing. But getting shutters checked is as easy (maybe even easier) than getting your light meter checked.

    Check this out for more details on exposure approximation factors:
    http://www.apug.org/forums/viewpost.php?p=1283800

  3. #13
    benjiboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    U.K.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,820
    Quote Originally Posted by marcmarc View Post
    Thanks for the additional replies Marc B and Peltigera. I'll contact Quality Light Metric just to be safe. If my meter checks out OK, then I know it's a shutter variance.
    Or failure of your sunny sixteen guestimate.
    Ben

  4. #14

    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Richmond, VA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,066
    To benjiboy's point - I think the sunny 16's biggest variation is in our own judgement of the conditions - the only sure condition is "bright sun", as soon as there are clouds, the conditions get gray (pun intended).
    As an inappropriate aside, the other day (I was using a d*****l camera) I was shooting in an empty church, lights low to balance intensity with late afternoon window lighting. ASA was 200, I was exposing manually with a 28PC Nikkor. Took a reading with my trusty old Sekonic L-398 Studio. The exposure was f/16 at 5 seconds, and although I had expected to make an adjustment, the image was perfect.
    As a variation on Deming's well known saying, "In incident we trust, all others be careful."

  5. #15
    Jim Noel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    1,846
    Blog Entries
    1
    I live in San Diego.
    Through testing I have discovered that except during Santa Ana winds, it is closer to Sunny f11, than Sunny f 16.
    As several have said, it is only a ball park estimate at best.
    [FONT=Comic Sans MS]Films NOT Dead - Just getting fixed![/FONT]

  6. #16
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    SE Australia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,579
    Images
    15
    The Sunny 16 rule is an approximation only, at best, an estimation which must be used with experience.

    BTW, is the meter set to 0.3 or 0.5 stop reading in its custom functions? Customised readout is one of the biggest causes of confusion with Sekonics because there is no visible warning on the display that a core metric has been altered, other than to realise the exposure steps at wider or narrower. Having said that, it is most unlikely that the Sekonic is at error with its metering: it is very fine and precise instrument. People really should move on from these cute, clubby, "rules of thumb" that only provide for increasing risk and failure and not refinement of metering technique that is so much a calling when armed with a Sekonic.
    .::Gary Rowan Higgins

    A comfort zone is a wonderful place. But nothing ever grows there.
    —Anon.






  7. #17

    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Montgomery, Il/USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    5,097
    Another factor to consider is your EI. if you haven't determined it. the film/developer/exposure combination can be off too.
    Rather than equipment problems I'd consider exposure/development first. If the exposure is consistently a bit under It may be you're using too high a film speed.

    As far as Sunny 16 being an approximation. so is any system is until tested and proven.
    Heavily sedated for your protection.

  8. #18
    cliveh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    3,317
    Images
    343
    Quote Originally Posted by marcmarc View Post
    Hi Everyone,
    I've been using a Sekonic L508 for years. I've noticed that it reads 1/2 stop slow when comparing it to "sunny 16" i.e. it will read f16 and 1/2 at 1/125 rather then an even 16 when I use FP4. However, when I take the iso down to 100, it then reads an even f16 at 1/125. The difference between iso 125 and 100 is about 1/3 of a stop correct? So is my meter under exposing? I normally down rate my film at half the box speed anyways but still my negs look a little thin in the shadows. Thanks for replies.
    Regard,
    Marc
    Without experience of using your meter with camera/ lighting ratio of what you photograph and the processed shots you produce, I would suggest this is an impossible question to answer.

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

  9. #19
    benjiboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    U.K.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,820
    Quote Originally Posted by George Collier View Post
    To benjiboy's point - I think the sunny 16's biggest variation is in our own judgement of the conditions - the only sure condition is "bright sun", as soon as there are clouds, the conditions get gray (pun intended).
    As an inappropriate aside, the other day (I was using a d*****l camera) I was shooting in an empty church, lights low to balance intensity with late afternoon window lighting. ASA was 200, I was exposing manually with a 28PC Nikkor. Took a reading with my trusty old Sekonic L-398 Studio. The exposure was f/16 at 5 seconds, and although I had expected to make an adjustment, the image was perfect.
    As a variation on Deming's well known saying, "In incident we trust, all others be careful."
    I've always thought George that the human eye is a very poor instrument for judging changes in light intensity because it reacts to changes so imperceptibly without the person noticing them.
    Ben

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin