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  1. #1
    marciofs's Avatar
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    Yellow and Green filter together...

    I usually use yellow filter to shoot nature, but I am wondering what effects it may have on green, brown and even on the sky if I use both Yellow and Green filter.

    Have any body tried?

  2. #2

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    To the extent that yellow blocks green and green blocks yellow and they both block blue, you will have very long exposures. Would be my guess.
    "There are a great many things I am in doubt about at the moment, and I should consider myself favoured if you would kindly enlighten me. Signed, Doubtful, off to Canada." (BJP 1914).

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  3. #3
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    We are speaking about one filter? I have yellow-green filter, some strange production, probably ex USSR, so no need for 2 filters.

  4. #4
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    OM-1n: Do I need to own a Leica?
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  5. #5
    baachitraka's Avatar
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    OM-1n: Do I need to own a Leica?
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  6. #6

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    To the extent that yellow blocks green and green blocks yellow
    1) Yellow is minus-blue, so lets green and red through.
    2) Normal, "light" green blocks red partially (unlike "process" or "color sep" green). And "blocks yellow" does not mean much since yellow is not a primary (additive color), being yellow=red+green

    Yellow-green was common ~50 years ago as an all-around filter: mild cloud enhancement, lightens foliage for a pleasant effect.

  7. #7

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    Hi there,

    Firstly, you need to be aware that most filters employed in photography are not 'pure'. By this I mean that a red filter generally lets some light from the rest of the spectrum through (there are filters that will only let their respective primary colours - red, blue and green - through but these are the exception to the norm).

    Generally speaking photographic filters for black & white work as follows:

    Red: Mainly lightens red and renders yellow and orange as a lighter grey plus renders green and blues as a darker tone

    Blue: Mainly lightens blue and renders purple as a lighter grey plus renders green, yellow, orange and red as a darker tone

    Green: Mainly lightens green and light yellows and renders bright green and orange as a lighter grey plus renders purple, orange and red as a darker tone

    Yellow: Mainly lightens yellow and renders bright green and orange as a lighter grey plus renders red and darker blues as a darker tone

    Combining yellow and green will require more exposure correction and will render yellow, orange and lighter greens as lighter tones and will darken everything else. The big problem with this combination is being able to accurately interpret both the scene and how the combined filters will affect the tonality. In addition, there will be the need to adequately compensate your exposure.

    The filter that I most used when doing landscape photography was a Wratten #12 (Minus Blue) filter. This filter looks yellow but is actually a special formulation for B&W that markedly lowers the tonal value of blues without affecting the other colours. It produces results similar to a red filter but far more subtle, removes haze, takes the blue out of deep shadows thereby creating more visual contrast and, all of this, with only a loss of one stop. The Minus Blue filter proved invaluable in getting good representation of landscape tonality in the UK, Brazil, Chile and Germany.

    I highly recommend you trying one out.

    Bests,

    David
    www.dsallen.de
    D.S. Allen, fotograf.

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  8. #8

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    Since a green filter also passes yellow light there is no advantage to using both. Use one or the other depending on the effect you wish to achieve.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  9. #9
    marciofs's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by baachitraka View Post
    Thank you.

    I am looking for photos made with this filter just to see how it looks like but I can't find.
    Any of you have seen it's effect?

  10. #10
    marciofs's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by David Allen View Post
    Hi there,

    Firstly, you need to be aware that most filters employed in photography are not 'pure'. By this I mean that a red filter generally lets some light from the rest of the spectrum through (there are filters that will only let their respective primary colours - red, blue and green - through but these are the exception to the norm).

    Generally speaking photographic filters for black & white work as follows:

    Red: Mainly lightens red and renders yellow and orange as a lighter grey plus renders green and blues as a darker tone

    Blue: Mainly lightens blue and renders purple as a lighter grey plus renders green, yellow, orange and red as a darker tone

    Green: Mainly lightens green and light yellows and renders bright green and orange as a lighter grey plus renders purple, orange and red as a darker tone

    Yellow: Mainly lightens yellow and renders bright green and orange as a lighter grey plus renders red and darker blues as a darker tone

    Combining yellow and green will require more exposure correction and will render yellow, orange and lighter greens as lighter tones and will darken everything else. The big problem with this combination is being able to accurately interpret both the scene and how the combined filters will affect the tonality. In addition, there will be the need to adequately compensate your exposure.

    The filter that I most used when doing landscape photography was a Wratten #12 (Minus Blue) filter. This filter looks yellow but is actually a special formulation for B&W that markedly lowers the tonal value of blues without affecting the other colours. It produces results similar to a red filter but far more subtle, removes haze, takes the blue out of deep shadows thereby creating more visual contrast and, all of this, with only a loss of one stop. The Minus Blue filter proved invaluable in getting good representation of landscape tonality in the UK, Brazil, Chile and Germany.

    I highly recommend you trying one out.

    Bests,

    David
    www.dsallen.de
    Thank you very much... I will look for this filter for sure.

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