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  1. #11
    MattKing's Avatar
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    I use plastic totes, and open them to circulate air regularly.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  2. #12
    Mark Feldstein's Avatar
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    There used to be an issue with the foam inserts in both metal and plastic boxes, emitting harmful gasses when the box gets hot. That's why case makers went to an inert foam insert some time ago, back in the 90's I believe. Back then, foam insert material was made specifically for equipment cases although even then I doubted its utility.

    I've always felt that if I'm in a comfortable environment, my gear should be ok as well. While I've never really considered any toxic emissions from PVC or other plastic cases, I'm pretty sure the manufacturers have. Plastic cases are great for lightweight waterproof or at least resistant equip. containers. Personally, I like Rimowa and Zero Haliburton metal cases for cameras and Anvil wood-based equipment cases for all my lighting. I also like Domke and Kinesis bags (http://www.kgear.com) for breathability and all of which have refillable or reusable dessicant containers. In a pinch, I've also used charcoal briquettes wrapped in a layer of cheese cloth or something like it, placed inside cases and bags to absorb moisture when I didn't feel dessicant was enough.
    Take it light ;>)
    Mark
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    Without guys like John Coltrane, Count Basie and Duke Ellington, life....would be meaningless.

  3. #13
    NedL's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by E. von Hoegh View Post
    Did you reactivate (dry out in an oven) the silicagel before storing the cameras? A silicagel packet will not absorb water indefinitely, it will soak up a certain amount and then it's just like a wet sponge. Anything stored with slicalgel needs to have the packets reactivated every few months or so, depending on conditions.
    The trouble with sealed containers is that they keep things in as well as out.
    I do reactivate mine ( they change color ) but I sure have a hard time remembering to do it. I need some kind of "mental reminder" like changing the smoke alarm batteries when we go to daylight savings. Even that doesn't always work... I change my furnace filter when we go off daylight savings, and last year I bought the new filter at that time but it's still sitting in the garage next to the furnace .

  4. #14

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    I use a "cordless dehumidifier" that contains about a pound of silica beads and has a built-in heating element to reactivate the silica after it gets saturated. I have found that these weigh about 480g after being heated to constant mass, and about 530g when saturated. I had one of these in a 2 qt lock&lock container for 6 months and it absorbed 10g of water (a fifth of its capacity). If that's the performance you get out of a pound of desiccant in a small container, imagine how insufficient a small packet is in a large container.

  5. #15
    GRHazelton's Avatar
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    I use a few shallow plastic "tubs" with snap on lids that don't seal but do keep out dust. The tubs are sized to fit under a sofa, out of sight but instantly accessible. Here in the Atlanta GA area the humidity can be fierce, so I'm looking to install a whole house dehumidifier. If I feel I'm about to mold or mildew, its time to do something!

  6. #16
    AgX
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    Outgassing depends of the material used for those containers. "Common" is not a exact term.
    I experienced some fogging to due a PVC camera case.
    A really strong fogging occured due the deteriaration of a polyether foam insert in a filter case.

  7. #17

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    My camera repair guy sez a sock full of dry rice is a good companion to a sealed storage space for cameras. If you feel it's absorbed all the moisture it can, I'd just put it in the oven (without turning on the oven!) for a few hours and it should dry back out and be ready for re-use.

  8. #18
    Peltigera's Avatar
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    I use plastic storage boxes. They are opened on a regular basis so will be well ventilated. Actually, they are several years old, so there will be no out-gassing from the plastics now - they are polythene, so I doubt there ever was. I don't bother with desiccants as our house is quite modern and so dry.

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by nosmok View Post
    I'd just put it in the oven (without turning on the oven!) for a few hours and it should dry back out and be ready for re-use.
    ... only if your oven has a standing pilot light. Some of that old advise does not translate very well to new ovens with electric ignitors (or very old ovens where one struck a match). Raising bread in an oven without a standing pilot is no better than leaving it on the counter, for instance.

  10. #20
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nosmok View Post
    My camera repair guy sez a sock full of dry rice is a good companion to a sealed storage space for cameras. If you feel it's absorbed all the moisture it can, I'd just put it in the oven (without turning on the oven!) for a few hours and it should dry back out and be ready for re-use.
    This made no sense to me, but then I've only ever had electric ovens.

    BrianShaw's post above "turned on the light" for me.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

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