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  1. #11
    MatthewDunn's Avatar
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    I'm sure this is well documented but as someone who is also learning about the effect of different filters on B&W work, I found the relevant discussion in AA's "The Negative" to be super helpful. Very comprehensive discussion with plenty of visual examples so that you can see (more or less) how each major filter works. Again, very new to this, so take my advice with a grain of salt.

  2. #12
    marciofs's Avatar
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    I once tried to make filters tests with digital camera and it didn't look close compared with the film results. At least not with my camera.

    I still didn't find a time to do it this week and next week I will be busy too. But thanks for the tips.

    I post the result here when I have them in case someone in the future look for the same info.

    By the way. Does anyone know a good and affordable black and white film that has less than 36 exposures? Because 36 exposure for test are often too many.

  3. #13
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
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    Yes 36 exposures are way too many! You've got company there!
    When you find a film with less than 36 bangs to a roll, please do let me know...
    ( Then again, there's always the very agreeable 10-12 exposures afforded by medium format...)
    .::Gary Rowan Higgins

    A comfort zone is a wonderful place. But nothing ever grows there.
    —Anon.






  4. #14
    f/16's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Poisson Du Jour View Post
    Yes 36 exposures are way too many! You've got company there!
    When you find a film with less than 36 bangs to a roll, please do let me know...
    ( Then again, there's always the very agreeable 10-12 exposures afforded by medium format...)
    A few weeks ago I was passing by a camera store and stopped in. They had Delta 100 24exp for half the price of 36, so I picked up 2 rolls.
    Bill

    Pentax 645, Pentax 6X7MLU, and many Nikons-F2 Photomic F2AS FM2N N2000 N6000 N6006 Nikomat FTN

  5. #15
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by marciofs View Post

    By the way. Does anyone know a good and affordable black and white film that has less than 36 exposures? Because 36 exposure for test are often too many.
    This is one of my favourite things about bulk loading your own 35mm - you can choose the length you want to shoot.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  6. #16

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    RE: shorter rolls.
    Freestyle in the US has 24 and 36 exposure rolls of several films. They're all either european, asian or british so should be available to you.
    Heavily sedated for your protection.

  7. #17
    marciofs's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    This is one of my favourite things about bulk loading your own 35mm - you can choose the length you want to shoot.
    How do you do it?

  8. #18

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    Buy a bulk loader and a bulk film with re-usable cassettes or use manufacturers' film cassettes that have been used and attach end of bulk film to the 2-3 cms that remain when a film has been cut off. When you open the bulk loader it is more or less self explanatory as to how you load it but instructions with the loader are usually provided.

    Do a search here on bulk loaders Plenty of posts on different loaders and their merits or faults.

    If I can bulk load then anybody can bulk load

    pentaxuser

  9. #19

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    I've been using a Lloyd's I bought new at Ritz Camera in 1972 for 5.95. Works just fine. I believe a 100 feet of PX or TX was maybe 15 dollars back then. Maybe $17--it was EXPENSIVE!

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by marciofs View Post
    What filter colour would you suggest to use when photographing close up green leaf and brown dry leaf on black and white negative?

    I mean... Does Yellow or orange gives good results on green leaf? Does red filter gives good results with brown dry leaf?

    I have Yellow, green, Orange, Blue and Red filters and I am avoiding spend money buying more filter.
    Here's what I did when I was in your position.
    I got a set of filters, and a color wheel. Filters on B&W will lighten like colors, and darken opposite colors. Try different filters, using the color wheel to get an idea what they will do and take notes of the filter and the exposure you used for each picture. Then, when you have your prints, you can decide which filters you like in which situations.
    The general rule is to use the lightest i.e. least dense filter which gives the desired effect. Giving more exposure will slightly lessen the effect, less exposure will slightly accentuate the effect.
    Again, keep accurate notes of the filter used and the compensation applied.

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