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  1. #1
    marciofs's Avatar
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    Filters on lens recommendation.

    What filter colour would you suggest to use when photographing close up green leaf and brown dry leaf on black and white negative?

    I mean... Does Yellow or orange gives good results on green leaf? Does red filter gives good results with brown dry leaf?

    I have Yellow, green, Orange, Blue and Red filters and I am avoiding spend money buying more filter.

  2. #2
    Chris Lange's Avatar
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    try an exposure with each and see what you prefer!
    See my work at my website CHRISTOPHER LANGE PHOTOGRAPHY

    or my snaps at my blog MINIMUM DENSITY
    --
    If you don't have it, then you don't have it.

  3. #3
    ic-racer's Avatar
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    I look through the filters. The best results will come through experimentation; since it is a still life, and you already have the filters, expose the scene through each filter and see which gives the best print.

  4. #4

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    Red and orange will yield a "darker " green leaf, yellow probably a slightly "lighter" green leaf since some yellow filters are yellow-green, green would give you a "lighter" green leaf . Check to see what yours is. The red and orange will probably have the opposite effect on the brown leaf. Try all as suggested as well as no filter which may turn out the best. Generally I would use a blue filter if I wanted to accentuate fog in a landscape under foggy conditions. Most of the time red, orange and yellow would be used to "darken" the blue of the sky and bring out the contrast of clouds against the sky. You might also consider orange to increase contrast in a landscape and green to lighten up green in a landscape. Some will use filters such as red to lighten a ruddy complexion or for a rather white skin for Caucasian subjects.

    Remember that in B&W you are dealing with values and the brown and green leaf could actually have the same value and with no filter come out in similar shades of gray so using a filter might be necessary for your purpose.

    http://www.jeffreyglasser.com/

  5. #5
    marciofs's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Lange View Post
    try an exposure with each and see what you prefer!
    This is what I usually do when trying a new object texture. But I thought somebody might have done it before and could tell their experience.

    It seems I will have to try myself.



    Thanks all for the tips.

  6. #6
    cliveh's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by marciofs View Post
    Does red filter gives good results with brown dry leaf?
    That depends on what you mean by good, as we can't tell what you are trying to achieve. Chris Lange gave you some good advice, as it is up to you.

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

  7. #7

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    The filter choice might be different depending on the picture. If you have a green leaf on a dark background you might want to lighten it. But against a light background you might want to darken it.

  8. #8
    f/16's Avatar
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    If you have a digital camera that has B&W mode, you could put the filter on the digicam and shoot to see what it looks like. It probably won't look exactly as with B&W film, but it will give you an idea. That's what I do sometimes. I'll shoot something with a digital and see what looks best before burning expensive film(I send it out for processing and it's $$$$).
    Bill

    Pentax 645, Pentax 6X7MLU, and many Nikons-F2 Photomic F2AS FM2N N2000 N6000 N6006 Nikomat FTN

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by f/16 View Post
    If you have a digital camera that has B&W mode, you could put the filter on the digicam and shoot to see what it looks like. It probably won't look exactly as with B&W film, but it will give you an idea. That's what I do sometimes. I'll shoot something with a digital and see what looks best before burning expensive film(I send it out for processing and it's $$$$).
    Harummph! That's what 35mm is for. Do your experimenting on 35, then use your normal camera. Digital schmital. Digital cameras are for people who shoot porn to keep from embarrassing themselves when they go to pick up their developed pictures.

  10. #10
    Bill Burk's Avatar
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    Haaa, I'll give you the answer.... Green. My favorite filter for close-ups of green things.

    Really you have good answers, try what you have and pick your favorite. It might be different than mine.

    But at least once you must get down on the ground and look sideways and up at green plants through a green filter.

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