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  1. #1

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    Cleaning Hoya HMC Filters ?

    I just happened on a new-in-the-box Hoya HMC filter in a color I wanted at a good price, so I deviated from my normal B+W snobbery and bought it. On the front of the box it says "Do not use any chemical cleanser for cleaning only a soft cotton cloth allowed". Really??? I can't use Panchro like I do on everything else, or a microfiber cloth, or Rosco tissue?

    Yes, it was relatively cheap, but I don't want to try my normal procedures if they're going to wreck it. Has anyone violated these rules and lived to tell the tale?

  2. #2
    benjiboy's Avatar
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    A Lens Pen works well on my Hoya H.M.C. filters.
    Ben

  3. #3
    Chrismat's Avatar
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    I use a product called Formula MC, sold by www.2filter.com. Works great.

  4. #4
    Ken Nadvornick's Avatar
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    The problem with HMC coatings is that almost anything that touches them, especially liquids, leaves spots or streaks. These are not permanently damaging. They simply reform in other areas the next time you clean them. It's terribly irritating.

    When the ones I have get dirty I have had luck by fully immersing them into mildly soapy water for a gentle full cleaning. Then thoroughly rinsing them in running standard tap water, followed by re-immersing them into distilled water, followed by an air dry with no touching, just like film. Doesn't always work perfectly, but it's far and away the best approach I've come up with.

    Ken
    "They are the proof that something was there and no longer is. Like a stain. And the stillness of them is boggling. You can turn away but when you come back they’ll still be there looking at you."

    — Diane Arbus, March 15, 1971, in response to a request for a brief statement about photographs

  5. #5

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    I've used Giotto's film cleaner on everything I own, and it does a quick, spiffy job.

  6. #6
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
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    Mist from breadth and microfibre cloth is sufficient. The multi-coating is extremely tough (so too, B+Ws)' the Super HMC filters have 7 layers, front and rear. If the filter is really dirty, wet the filter, smear dishwashing liquid on both sides, gently rub then rinse well under water. Dry with a tissue then microfibre cloth. Tissues will not scratch these filters.
    “The photographer must determine how he wants the finished print to look before he exposes the negative.
    Before releasing the shutter, he must seek 'the flame of recognition,' a sense that the picture would reveal
    the greater mystery of things...more clearly than the eyes see."
    ~Edward Weston, 1922.

  7. #7

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    Thanks all. So it sounds like I can treat this just like my other filters, which is what I'd hoped. I'll watch out for streaks.



 

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