Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,550   Posts: 1,544,793   Online: 1028
      
Page 3 of 6 FirstFirst 123456 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 51
  1. #21
    Rick A's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    north central Pa
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    5,941
    Images
    33
    I do a final soak in LFN mixed in distilled H2O with a couple of capfulls of 91% isopropyl alcohol, then shake the bejesus outta the reel prior to hanging the film to dry(gets excess water off). Of course, I can't do that with sheet film, but I never get spotting or streaks. As for dust, I keep an air cleaner running in my DR at all times.
    Rick A
    Argentum aevum

  2. #22
    clayne's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    San Francisco, CA | Kuching, MY | Jakarta, ID
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,838
    Images
    57
    Drying film is so easy but people keep trying all of these different snake oil methods. Here's all you need:

    1. Distilled water.
    2. Wetting agent.

    Immerse the film on the reel (assuming stainless) for 30 seconds. Hang and leave it alone.
    Last edited by clayne; 08-19-2013 at 05:56 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    Stop worrying about grain, resolution, sharpness, and everything else that doesn't have a damn thing to do with substance.

    http://www.flickr.com/kediwah

  3. #23
    Klainmeister's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Santa Fe, NM
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    1,493
    Images
    30
    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Cole View Post
    Great minds think alike.
    I think I'm in that boat?m Same process here, no issues
    K.S. Klain

  4. #24
    Roger Cole's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Suburbs of Atlanta, GA USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,890
    Quote Originally Posted by clayne View Post
    Drying film is so easy but people keep trying all of these different snake oil methods. Here's all you need:

    1. Distiller water.
    2. Wetting agent.

    Immerse the film on the reel (assuming stainless) for 30 seconds. Hang and leave it alone.
    As you say, "assuming stainless." If you use plastic reels, which I do, it's best to never immerse them in wetting agent. It builds up, makes the reels sticky, and is very difficult to remove. I remove the film from the reels for the wetting agent bath.

    I use plastic partly because I use a Jobo, but also because I hate stainless. I tried and tried and never managed to load the things reliably. The Jobo reels I find very easy. YMMV.

  5. #25
    cliveh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    3,318
    Images
    343
    Quote Originally Posted by clayne View Post
    Drying film is so easy but people keep trying all of these different snake oil methods. Here's all you need:

    1. Distiller water.
    2. Wetting agent.

    Immerse the film on the reel (assuming stainless) for 30 seconds. Hang and leave it alone.
    No, even simpler - de-ionised water after wash and hang to dry in ambient temperature.

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

  6. #26
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Minnesota
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    14,289
    Images
    301
    Quote Originally Posted by clayne View Post
    Drying film is so easy but people keep trying all of these different snake oil methods. Here's all you need:

    1. Distiller water.
    2. Wetting agent.

    Immerse the film on the reel (assuming stainless) for 30 seconds. Hang and leave it alone.
    I've had nothing but issues doing what you suggest. It isn't until I remove all of the excess liquid that I get squeaky clean negatives.
    The point is that what works for you might not work for everybody else. My own situation is such that I can not do anything about cat hair and dust in the air; the house we live in is too small to claim an individual room as darkroom, so I'm confined to using a section of an unfinished basement in a 100 year old house, which I share with three cats, storage shelves, laundry machine and drier, furnace, water heater, and a big dehumidifier. When I do as you suggest, I end up with dust all over the film.

    The point of my long explanation of what I do has to do with debunking the common thought that 'absolutely nothing' can touch the emulsion when finishing up. I am living proof that it works very well, if done with great care.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  7. #27
    cliveh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    3,318
    Images
    343
    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Bertilsson View Post
    I've had nothing but issues doing what you suggest. It isn't until I remove all of the excess liquid that I get squeaky clean negatives.
    The point is that what works for you might not work for everybody else. My own situation is such that I can not do anything about cat hair and dust in the air; the house we live in is too small to claim an individual room as darkroom, so I'm confined to using a section of an unfinished basement in a 100 year old house, which I share with three cats, storage shelves, laundry machine and drier, furnace, water heater, and a big dehumidifier. When I do as you suggest, I end up with dust all over the film.

    The point of my long explanation of what I do has to do with debunking the common thought that 'absolutely nothing' can touch the emulsion when finishing up. I am living proof that it works very well, if done with great care.
    Thomas, try my method, 30 seconds or so in de-ionised water after wash. Hang in ambient temperature and do not wipe or touch film in any way and leave to dry. Let me know if it works. I have been doing this for many years, with no dust, drying marks or cat hairs.

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

  8. #28
    clayne's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    San Francisco, CA | Kuching, MY | Jakarta, ID
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,838
    Images
    57
    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Cole View Post
    As you say, "assuming stainless." If you use plastic reels, which I do, it's best to never immerse them in wetting agent. It builds up, makes the reels sticky, and is very difficult to remove. I remove the film from the reels for the wetting agent bath.

    I use plastic partly because I use a Jobo, but also because I hate stainless. I tried and tried and never managed to load the things reliably. The Jobo reels I find very easy. YMMV.
    3. If using plastic, switch to stainless. :-)

    Honestly, the emphasis is on, cover it with distilled water/wetting agent (with whatever method), hang it and DO NOT MESS WITH IT.
    Stop worrying about grain, resolution, sharpness, and everything else that doesn't have a damn thing to do with substance.

    http://www.flickr.com/kediwah

  9. #29
    clayne's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    San Francisco, CA | Kuching, MY | Jakarta, ID
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,838
    Images
    57
    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Bertilsson View Post
    I've had nothing but issues doing what you suggest. It isn't until I remove all of the excess liquid that I get squeaky clean negatives.
    The point is that what works for you might not work for everybody else. My own situation is such that I can not do anything about cat hair and dust in the air; the house we live in is too small to claim an individual room as darkroom, so I'm confined to using a section of an unfinished basement in a 100 year old house, which I share with three cats, storage shelves, laundry machine and drier, furnace, water heater, and a big dehumidifier. When I do as you suggest, I end up with dust all over the film.

    The point of my long explanation of what I do has to do with debunking the common thought that 'absolutely nothing' can touch the emulsion when finishing up. I am living proof that it works very well, if done with great care.
    I am also living proof that doing nothing at all results in perfectly fine negatives.

    Disclaimer: I use a drying cabinet and do not mess with it after I hang it. However, before that, I used the bathroom and had no issues either.

    How do you expect removing excess moisture is going to protect you against cat hair or dust in the air though? The film is saturated with moisture and will be tacky until it isn't tacky. The surface water, which is gravity drawn, isn't going to massively change the equation when it comes to the core removal of moisture from the film. Even if you used a completely lint-free cloth, wiped off all excess moisture (ignoring the possibility of scratches), any dust that shows up is still going to adhere.
    Stop worrying about grain, resolution, sharpness, and everything else that doesn't have a damn thing to do with substance.

    http://www.flickr.com/kediwah

  10. #30
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Minnesota
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    14,289
    Images
    301
    Quote Originally Posted by cliveh View Post
    Thomas, try my method, 30 seconds or so in de-ionised water after wash. Hang in ambient temperature and do not wipe or touch film in any way and leave to dry. Let me know if it works. I have been doing this for many years, with no dust, drying marks or cat hairs.
    I have tried it, Clive. No use I'm afraid. Even when there were no cats, but rabbits instead. I have tried five or six different methods, to no avail.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

Page 3 of 6 FirstFirst 123456 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin