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  1. #11

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    My first thought is that none of it is going to be much good after spending any time in a shop window. Silver print, inkjet, offset ink--any of it is going to fade in no time in a shop window. May as well just shoot the 6x7 to keep cost down and spend that money having made, or making several prints so she can take one down and replace it after it fades.

  2. #12
    ic-racer's Avatar
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    I'd not waste time and money trying to conserve film by shooting 4x10. Use the whole 8x10 sheet and crop when printing. Just make sure you use the appropriate lens and aperture for your crop size.

  3. #13
    vpwphoto's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ic-racer View Post
    I'd not waste time and money trying to conserve film by shooting 4x10. Use the whole 8x10 sheet and crop when printing. Just make sure you use the appropriate lens and aperture for your crop size.
    +1
    do what you know.

  4. #14

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    I've seen 35mm enlarged to 4'x6' with very good results. It has a lot more to do with the quality of the lens, the printing process and the skill of the photographer than the size of the original.

  5. #15

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    If you have an 8x10, and know how to use it, then you may as well go for it. If money is an issue, then go down to a format which suits your budget. I've never gone higher than 4x5, but if I got a job like you're to do, that's what I'd use. 6x7 is likely more than capable, but may as well have resolution to spare.

  6. #16

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    i'd use a small format and a good lens, and a lab you trust ...
    i made some huge display transparencies years ago for a hotel that were displayed at
    an airport ... used 35mm ( and it came out great ! )
    as stated before, viewing distance is everything in a case like this ...

  7. #17
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doc W View Post
    A friend wants me to do a colour photo of a 'babbling brook" that will be enlarged to 2' x 6' for a poster for her shop window. I can shoot from 6x7 to 8x10 (including 5x7 although I can't seem to find any 5x7 colour film).

    Which format would you use for such an application? Negative or reversal? Will 4x5 or even 6x7 do the job and is 8x10 overkill (it certainly is more expensive to scan)?
    As others have indicated, use the format that you get the best results from.

    2' x 6' is well within the capability of 6x7. If you have the right lens for 4x5, that could be more than enough. If you have a 6x17 back for your 4x5, shoot roll film using that.

    I tend to prefer negative film to transparency film unless I intend to project the results (or print Ilfochrome). A babbling brook may offer some extreme brightness ranges, so negative film might be best for that.

    I don't have the format choices available to you. With my 6x7 equipment I would shoot two rolls - one Ektar 100, the other Portra 160 - and I would use the results that give me the colour saturation I liked best.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

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