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  1. #1
    Doc W's Avatar
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    Which format makes sense?

    A friend wants me to do a colour photo of a 'babbling brook" that will be enlarged to 2' x 6' for a poster for her shop window. I can shoot from 6x7 to 8x10 (including 5x7 although I can't seem to find any 5x7 colour film).

    Which format would you use for such an application? Negative or reversal? Will 4x5 or even 6x7 do the job and is 8x10 overkill (it certainly is more expensive to scan)?

  2. #2

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    Quote Originally Posted by Doc W View Post
    A friend wants me to do a colour photo of a 'babbling brook" that will be enlarged to 2' x 6' for a poster for her shop window. I can shoot from 6x7 to 8x10 (including 5x7 although I can't seem to find any 5x7 colour film).

    Which format would you use for such an application? Negative or reversal? Will 4x5 or even 6x7 do the job and is 8x10 overkill (it certainly is more expensive to scan)?
    I used 6x7 to make some 2'x3' displays for a booth at a machine design show, the minimum viewing distance was about 6' and they looked very good.

    I'd use 4x5 for your project if it will be viewed from any normal distance.
    Sadly, most don't know what a sharp print is and the quality goes unrecognised. If I was hanging a 2'x6' with my name on it I would use 8x10.

  3. #3
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    I think I might get 8x10 color film (if 5x7 isn't available) and cut it down to 5x7 size. The 2x6 shape is going to waste a lot of the 8x10 format anyway. At least 5x7 is more the right shape though still not perfect. 6x7cm would be good enough from a little viewing distance but probably wouldn't hold up for close viewing.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dpurdy View Post
    I think I might get 8x10 color film (if 5x7 isn't available) and cut it down to 5x7 size. The 2x6 shape is going to waste a lot of the 8x10 format anyway. At least 5x7 is more the right shape though still not perfect. 6x7cm would be good enough from a little viewing distance but probably wouldn't hold up for close viewing.
    Use an 8x10 with divider boards, you'll waste less film and get two shots. Now that I think of it, that's possibly what I'd do. 1:3 is a hard aspect ratio.

  5. #5
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Why not shoot 10"x4" with a 10x8 camera, it's quite easy to do with a modified sheath for a DDS (double dark slide), OK it's more likely to be slightly narrower in practice but that fits the 6x2 format better anyway.

    Ian

  6. #6
    cliveh's Avatar
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    8" X 10" perhaps.

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

  7. #7
    Doc W's Avatar
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    I like the idea of two 4x10's but I have no idea where to get the proper equipment ("divider boards"? "DDS"?)

  8. #8
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    I hope you are being paid well, or love this friend a lot, or are independently wealthy.
    Color LF isn't cheap or for the faint of heart.

    In the end if it's going to be scanned and screen printed... well you can see where I am going...... d s l r and rent a TS lens for the price of film and processing.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by Doc W View Post
    I like the idea of two 4x10's but I have no idea where to get the proper equipment ("divider boards"? "DDS"?)
    Divider boards go in the back of the camera, they allow you to make two 8x5 or 4x10 exposures, or four 4x5 exposures on one sheet of 8x10 film. I have a set for my Deardorff V8. "DDS" in this case means "double dark slide" - what we call a "filmholder". You can modify the darkslide by cutting it in half, so it masks half the sheet, but you'll need an expendable darkslide.

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    Quote Originally Posted by vpwphoto View Post
    I hope you are being paid well, or love this friend a lot, or are independently wealthy.
    Color LF isn't cheap or for the faint of heart.

    In the end if it's going to be scanned and screen printed... well you can see where I am going...... d s l r and rent a TS lens for the price of film and processing.
    Or that you just love the challenge of using film to make this poster. Sometimes, the challenge is enough.
    In life you only get one great dog, one great car, and one great woman. Pet the dog. Drive the car. Make love to the woman. Don't mix them up.

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