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  1. #1

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    handheld light meters

    I'm going to trade a lens for a handheld light meter. I'd greatly appreciate some recommendations of what to buy.

    Thanks!

  2. #2

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    Quote Originally Posted by mporter012 View Post
    I'm going to trade a lens for a handheld light meter. I'd greatly appreciate some recommendations of what to buy.

    Thanks!
    ?? What lens, which meter?

  3. #3
    jp498's Avatar
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    Nikon D600 makes a pretty good light meter. For something pocketable, a sekonic L208

  4. #4
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    What do you want to measure: incident or reflective light, natural or flash light... or all of the above which puts you in an expensive braket.
    Mihai Costea

    "There's more to the picture
    Than meets the eye." - Neil Young

    Galleries:My PN & My APUG

  5. #5
    whlogan's Avatar
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    Sekonic 508
    will answer all your needs forever.... expensive, too big time
    Logan

  6. #6
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
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    Sekonic L758/D.
    Spot, incident, reflective, duplex, additive/subtractive/split/baseline...oh, the list is endless, and the price... well, you didn't say what your limit is...
    it's probably as high as you can (or want) to go.

    But is that necessary?
    No.

    My concern is that you should first get your hands on some light reading (yes, well...) to learn what's involved with the use and application of light meters. It is, in essence, YOU who is doing all the decision making. The simplest reflective/incident meters are relatively inexpensive to use and easy to learn quickly, but like anything in life method and how you approach it determines the outcome. The most expensive and elaborate and feature-rich meter on the planet will not give you beautiful images if you do not have the extant skills base to guide it, and your decisions, through the analytical process of 'reading' a scene and transferring the meter's "recommendations" (which are only that) to the camera, from which on occasion you will have reason to deviate prudently from what the meter says as opposed to particular elements of the scene that you wish to render differently.
    .::Gary Rowan Higgins

    A comfort zone is a wonderful place. But nothing ever grows there.
    —Anon.






  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Poisson Du Jour View Post
    Sekonic L758/D.
    Spot, incident, reflective, duplex, additive/subtractive/split/baseline...oh, the list is endless, and the price... well, you didn't say what your limit is...
    it's probably as high as you can (or want) to go.

    But is that necessary?
    No.

    My concern is that you should first get your hands on some light reading (yes, well...) to learn what's involved with the use and application of light meters. It is, in essence, YOU who is doing all the decision making. The simplest reflective/incident meters are relatively inexpensive to use and easy to learn quickly, but like anything in life method and how you approach it determines the outcome. The most expensive and elaborate and feature-rich meter on the planet will not give you beautiful images if you do not have the extant skills base to guide it, and your decisions, through the analytical process of 'reading' a scene and transferring the meter's "recommendations" (which are only that) to the camera, from which on occasion you will have reason to deviate prudently from what the meter says as opposed to particular elements of the scene that you wish to render differently.
    Quite true. Thanks for the thoughts.

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by naeroscatu View Post
    What do you want to measure: incident or reflective light, natural or flash light... or all of the above which puts you in an expensive braket.
    Well, I MOSTLY shoot landscapes, but on occasion, portraits. 98% of the portraits I take are outdoors, in natural light, but I'm actually interested in dabbling in flash light portraits as well, but measuring flash light is very low priority at this point.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by E. von Hoegh View Post
    ?? What lens, which meter?
    I have a Nikkor 28 ais 2.8 that I'm looking to trade for a light meter of some sort and a ball head.

  10. #10
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
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    Most modern (digital) meters measure ambient and flash, or a combination of the two, with variables e.g. 40-60 split (this is the variable part).
    For portraits outdoors in natural light, incident, reflective of spot; all have their definite uses. Flash is never in practice to be made the dominant illumination in outdoor portraits — enough, just a kiss, to fill / balance any distracting shadows and no more.

    Not sure what a Nikkor 28mm f2.8 is worth but selling privately would be better than taking it to a dealer. Second hand market light meters would be much cheaper and a better choice when starting out than jumping in at the all-singing, all-dancing end. I started off with a Polaris meter many years ago which cost me $200 — way beyond my student budget at the time, but it did the trick — until it was stolen...
    .::Gary Rowan Higgins

    A comfort zone is a wonderful place. But nothing ever grows there.
    —Anon.






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