Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 68,709   Posts: 1,482,886   Online: 1042
      
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 19
  1. #1
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    the villages .centralflorida,USA and Germany
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,144
    Images
    1

    how to make better images

    this s a question to the more experienced photographers on APUG:
    Over the years,what was the most effective for you in getting better images? for me it was studying the iportfolios of other great photographers such asHelmut Newton, Yosuf Karsh,Horst Horst,|Richard Avedonand the like, technical books were interesting and helped to fine-tune technique buttheie effect on my learning curve was minimal. How about Your experience?
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    15,260
    Blog Entries
    2
    Images
    2
    hi ralph

    the most effective thing for me was working in a portrait studio for almost a year.
    SEEING and HANDLING beautiful negatives and karsh-esque portraits, and then
    working with someone to become a better printer. and then ... processing film and making prints
    for 9 hours a day

    i never really have gotten much out of technical books, not that i don't have any, i have a handful of them
    but the physical objects did it for me ...

    ( not that you can see much of that in the things i tend to post here on apug )

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Southern USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,527
    For me it was improving my darkroom skills. I found books like the AA series to be invaluable.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Richmond VA.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,548
    Quote Originally Posted by Gerald C Koch View Post
    For me it was improving my darkroom skills. I found books like the AA series to be invaluable.
    +1

    Jeff

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Seattle, Washington area
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    365
    +2. After four workshops with Ansel, it all (negative and prints) finally started to sink in. I studied his books and others until my b/w landscapes started to sing. But the real learning was from experience in the darkroom. I'm still learning as the available materials change. It's a bottomless chasm. I love it!

  6. #6
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Victoria, Australia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,378
    Images
    15
    Choosing my subject, and the Three Rs: Rote, Repetition and Refinement. It also helps to have a natural capacity for and awareness of, effective visual arrangement.
    I didn't have way back then, nor do I have now, much interest in Ansel Adams or other luminaries.
    .::Gary Rowan Higgins

    One beautiful image is worth
    a thousand hours of therapy.


    "It is horrifying that we have to fight our own government
    to save the environment."
    .::Ansel Adams






  7. #7

    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Richmond, VA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,064
    "Let me cound the ways" - kind of an accumulation of things -
    After high school, the Army (don't laugh - you never know who you will meet that can help - or say something that you'll remember forever) for basics at least.
    Architecture school gave me a sense of design that applies to many areas, photography too.
    Books of course, but as you point out, value can be limited.
    Sharing work with others, shooting in groups, etc.
    Fred Picker's newsletters and phone conversations - again one viewpoint, but you never know where you will pick something up that changes you. Similarly, Lenswork magazine.
    Teaching is great, if your students are in the habit of questioning your lessons.
    Doing it.
    I know you asked for one - I got on a roll.

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Montreal, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,265
    I'm separating "images" from technical skills and print quality here. So in terms of better images, mostly my work got much better when I let go of what I thought I liked, what I thought other people would appreciate, etc., and started being completely honest in my photography. Along the way the work of certain other photographers helped me do that. George Tice was an important influence in that respect, for example.

  9. #9
    Hatchetman's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Chicago, IL
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    436
    Images
    4
    Quote Originally Posted by Michael R 1974 View Post
    I let go of what I thought I liked, what I thought other people would appreciate, etc., and started being completely honest in my photography.
    You mean honest in terms of what you thought was important subject matter or enjoyable to work on or ??

    It's an interesting thought. I think I'm in the process of letting go of what other people think, but not entirely sure how to move forward from there.

  10. #10
    Regular Rod's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Derbyshire
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    327
    Surely the first step to better photographs is to discover that the viewfinder is a picture frame and not a gun sight?


    RR
    Last edited by Regular Rod; 10-11-2013 at 10:31 AM. Click to view previous post history.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin