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  1. #1
    baachitraka's Avatar
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    When a Camera or Lens reach the cult status

    I was wondering why my OM-1n have cult following so I am thinking when a camera or lens have cult status or following.
    OM-1n: Do I need to own a Leica?
    Rolleicord Va: Humble.
    Holga 120GFN: Amazingly simple yet it produces outstanding negatives to print.

  2. #2

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    Some cameras just get it all right the first time -- usability, quality, endurance, a nice elegant feel that you naturally love. OM1 is one such camera. Leica M3 is another, early Nikons and so on and so forth.

    Almost a pity they felt a need to come out with new models. Except for adding meters and, of late, that whole digital thing, Leica almost hasn't.

  3. #3
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
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    That camera had a cult following way back in the early 1980s; In our bicycle touring days criss-crossing the country with friends, I have owned an OM1N, OM2N, OM4, OMTi... (the OM4/Ti is my pick for its brilliant multi-spot/averaging metering, still on a par today with the best spot meters) ... virtually any of the OM cameras still have a keen following, especially with digital-to-analogue students/hipsters. It's the quality and small footprint — always friendly to people with small hands, even if the top plate layout was a little unorthodox (well, so too was the OM4). And lenses can still command a pretty penny, though you don't see many of them.
    .::Gary Rowan Higgins

    A comfort zone is a wonderful place. But nothing ever grows there.
    —Anon.






  4. #4
    MattKing's Avatar
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    With the OM1, Olympus seemed to come out of nowhere to a position of some prominence in the 35mm SLR market.

    Suddenly, there was another professional system in the marketplace, and because of its size it was significantly different when compared with the rest of the marketplace.

    Early adopters were almost religious about their appreciation for their cameras and lenses.

    Other brands responded by either reducing the size of their competing models or adding smaller models to their line.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  5. #5
    hdeyong's Avatar
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    I don't think myth will ever produce a cult following, the product has to be really good. And, the OM's are really good.
    I have 2 of them, and a Canon AE-1, and a Konica Autoreflex and 2 Pentaxes, and the OM's do 90% of the shooting. The lenses are compact, high quality and almost all use the same filter size. I can carry 2 bodies and 2 lenses all day and not get shoulder sag.
    Olympus just plain got it right.

  6. #6

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    I remember when the OM1 first came out. I think I saw my first one in 1972. Other than its size, I considered it otherwise pretty neat, but just another brand that wasn't a Nikon or a Pentax, which were the leading 2 brands. I never considered at that time, that it would indeed withstand the test of time and emerge as it has as a very respectable camera line indeed.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by hdeyong View Post
    I don't think myth will ever produce a cult following, the product has to be really good. And, the OM's are really good.
    I have 2 of them, and a Canon AE-1, and a Konica Autoreflex and 2 Pentaxes, and the OM's do 90% of the shooting. The lenses are compact, high quality and almost all use the same filter size. I can carry 2 bodies and 2 lenses all day and not get shoulder sag.
    Olympus just plain got it right.
    What a pity that they have gone down the pan since.

    However for me it was the Pentax Spotmatic series. The popular advert at the time for them was:- 'Just hold a Pentax'. It was just right, a bit bigger than the Olympus which suited me because they were just a bit small for my hands. I tried an OM1n and an OM2n and then went back to Pentax but with a Model KX which was even more perfect. Try and find a decent KX these days it is a bit like looking for Rocking Horse droppings.

  8. #8

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    Remember that when the OM1 was launched, Olympus was building on its reputation with the high-end half-frame Pen series, like the Pen FT my wife had. The FT was a super camera but half-frame was actually a pain - too many shots on a colour film, difficulty getting films of choice processed and mounted, lack of full-frame quality in terms of grain. So when the full-frame OM1 appeared there was general rejoicing and buying. My boss bought one of the first (replacing his Praktica and lenses). We were blown away by its size, quality and handling. Olympus really did make a winner. Later, I had an OM2n, OM2SP (the only camera I have had that broke at a key moment) and OM4Ti (the best of them all). I only sold them when I realised that life with autofocus was much easier. It is interesting to see how the makers of some cult cameras (Pentax as well as Olympus) just took the wrong decisions that left them very much as also rans a decade or so later. I suspect cult status comes from brilliant industrial design that manages to combine ergonomics, elegance in looks and operation, and quality.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by baachitraka View Post
    I was wondering why my OM-1n have cult following so I am thinking when a camera or lens have cult status or following.
    is the second half of this strange sentence a question? if so, i can tell you why i light a candle for my F2 in every forsaken chapel in iroise--when i dropped one on the ferry to ouessant last month, there was a dent in the steel manhole cover... for the life of me i could not find the point of impact on the F2



    an attempt at generalization--it fits the hand and does the job. always

    can you name a "cult camera" that explodes when you hit that button?


  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by hdeyong View Post
    I don't think myth will ever produce a cult following, the product has to be really good.
    You are badly mistaken. See the silly prices that f/1.4 and f/1.9 Boyer Saphir lenses bring at auction. These are not particularly good lenses.

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