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  1. #1
    Jesper's Avatar
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    19th century backgrounds

    I was lucky enough to win an auction for three 19th century backgrounds yesterday and now I just have to go and collect them. I've been lusting for backgrounds like these for quite some time and now it's playtime. (Hopefully I managed to attach images of them)
    Anyone using old canvas background here on apug?
    What kind of props do you suggest?
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails background2.jpg   background1.jpg   background3.jpg  

  2. #2
    Whiteymorange's Avatar
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    Sitter's chair, maybe a plant stand and potted fern or a tall table for standing portraits?

  3. #3
    Rafal Lukawiecki's Avatar
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    Please post your results. Have fun!
    Rafal Lukawiecki
    See rafal.net | Read rafal.net/articles

  4. #4

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    You will also need an urn or a plinth.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  5. #5
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    Fantastic!
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  6. #6
    Barry S's Avatar
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    Those are fantastic--as a wet plate artist, I'm jealous! It's very rare finding 19th c backgrounds--very rare! Those are in beautiful condition, too. For background #1, a 19th c "fainting couch" for portraits of the ladies, or at the very least, a plush bench. A small table with a tall vase. An elegant study chair for portraits of the gents.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    For the #3 background, some rough-hewn walking sticks and old canvas ruck sacks. Have fun!
    Last edited by Barry S; 01-15-2014 at 01:49 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  7. #7
    Jesper's Avatar
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    Thanks for all the advice. I'm lucky enough to have a canapé (fainting couch) from the 1880s, two armchairs and a table from the 1890s but of course I need to get a fern and an urn. I will also need to get a half column (I might have to build that one myself. I'm really looking forward to testing the backgrounds. This will be fun.

  8. #8

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    It all sounds like great fun! Please post some examples when you can.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  9. #9
    cliveh's Avatar
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    I once read an interesting description about the use of 19th century photographic backgrounds, where they would swing the background cloth on a board behind the sitter (a sort of reverse panning effect) to create a blurred background and thus enhance the relative sharpness of the subject. I don’t know if anyone does such a technique today?

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon



 

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