Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,568   Posts: 1,573,500   Online: 691
      
Page 3 of 6 FirstFirst 123456 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 53
  1. #21
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Vic., Australia.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,659
    Images
    15
    I don't think one should go to the trouble and expense of shooting transparency just to have the slides sitting on the lightbox or to project them. That's quite expensive for the end result, and given that Fuji will be increasing prices between 22 and 25% this April, one should be looking at squeezing every bit of value out of transparency film and the beauty if offers in imaging.

    It is a specialised area to print from slides without too much loss of quality, but "match slide" is actually not possible in a technical sense, post-scan once colourimetrics and profiling have taken over. The gamut of slide film is not the same as RGB (and vice-versa), so post-op work strips that and recombines into an expanded matrix (sRGB or AdobeRGB) which is then further tightened up for loss at print. There is a lot to be said, a lot in getting exposure spot-on at the time of exposure, in the camera and not rely on corrections available at the post stage, which will only derange the image — essentially a compromise.This is very especially true for highlights that have blown, shadows that have blocked up or film that has casted due to expiry or improper storage or exposure. The print process is the other specialised aspect requiring a thorough understanding of colourimetrics-profiling specific to each type of emulsion and matching it to the printer — usually there is a loss of around 0.5 to 1 stop at this stage. And by and by, it is not inkjet printing but exposure to hybrid photographic paper.

    When done professionally by experienced ops with input from the photographer (proofing etc.) this hybrid process is the bees knees in quality and one of the reasons Ilfochrome Classic did not stand a chance in its dying days because of the emergence and progress of hybrid materials and workflows. Sure, slides look gorgeous on a lightbox and people will crowd around to see the "living images" glow before their eyes. In a nutshell, use slide film and exploit it to the max.


  2. #22
    fretlessdavis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Southern AZ
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    277
    Images
    1
    I would argue against the economy aspect. Slides can be displayed as slides. Negatives cannot. For B&W work, a roll of 120 developed, and 5" prints made from it will cost almost the same in the long run. Without those prints, there is nothing to display.

    Also, a lot of those issues that you mentioned above, with careful filter selection and exposure won't happen. Blocked shadows, blown highlights, and casts of film won't be there if you're careful.

    I also get your point about sRGB not being similar to the gamut of slides, but a good printer when told "print to slide" will get DAMN close.
    New-ish convert to film.
    Pentax MX for 35mm
    Bronica ETRS for 645

  3. #23
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Vic., Australia.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,659
    Images
    15
    Quote Originally Posted by fretlessdavis View Post
    I would argue against the economy aspect. Slides can be displayed as slides. Negatives cannot. For B&W work, a roll of 120 developed, and 5" prints made from it will cost almost the same in the long run. Without those prints, there is nothing to display.

    Also, a lot of those issues that you mentioned above, with careful filter selection and exposure won't happen. Blocked shadows, blown highlights, and casts of film won't be there if you're careful.

    I also get your point about sRGB not being similar to the gamut of slides, but a good printer when told "print to slide" will get DAMN close.

    Sometimes though the problems endemic to transparency are taken into account yet can still and do happen, even with careful exposure based on experience. Changing light is one of the biggest traps for photographers, especially hand-held metering. In-camera meters will track changing light during exposure (e.g. evaluative/matrix/multipattern or whatever). This all comes back to bracketing in those situations where some doubt or uncertainty exists. It's good insurance. Oh, you can always go back, too.

    Lots of tricks are employed to bring a print to life from transparency; metallic media provides a beautiful, radiant glow to highlights under spot illumination while cotton / rag art media emphasises subtle colours and textures. In the end though, the print will be an entirely different and individual beast to the transparency it came from (just like a wet darkroom print from a negative), and if it's done right, you'll be darned happy with the result.


  4. #24
    Alan Klein's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    New Jersey .........formerly NYC.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    499
    I shoot Velvia 50 in 120 mf 6x7mm landscapes. I scan and print at home with a flat bed and print small size 8 1/2" x11". What print process, paper, etc would you recommend for large prints let's say 16x20" and larger? Thanks. Alan.
    Edit: in outside lab.

  5. #25
    StoneNYC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Connecticut, USA
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    7,794
    Images
    225
    Quote Originally Posted by Alan Klein View Post
    I shoot Velvia 50 in 120 mf 6x7mm landscapes. I scan and print at home with a flat bed and print small size 8 1/2" x11". What print process, paper, etc would you recommend for large prints let's say 16x20" and larger? Thanks. Alan.
    Edit: in outside lab.
    I use Dwayne's Photo for printing my scanned slides because they use light-jet style printing on RA-4 paper essentially a digital projector and chemical print, the results are generally excellent. I've had one mess up and they went above and beyond to fix it (re-did an 11x14 print 6 times for me).

    I prefer slides on metallic paper, but the normal paper they use, whatever it is, is also good. It's all kodak for sure.
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  6. #26
    fretlessdavis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Southern AZ
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    277
    Images
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by StoneNYC View Post
    I use Dwayne's Photo for printing my scanned slides because they use light-jet style printing on RA-4 paper essentially a digital projector and chemical print, the results are generally excellent. I've had one mess up and they went above and beyond to fix it (re-did an 11x14 print 6 times for me).

    I prefer slides on metallic paper, but the normal paper they use, whatever it is, is also good. It's all kodak for sure.
    +1 on Dwayne's. It's where I send my slides and occasional C-41. They do very well when asked to match color to my slides. I've never been disappointed. Sadly, they don't do metallic, just Kodak Supra Endura Ultra Glossy or whatever.

    They're printing is much more reasonably priced, too.

    Metallic looks fantastic for Velvia and cityscapes and landscapes... or any shot with water in it. Not a huge fan of it for people or animal shots, though. Adorama's print shop does metallic at reasonable prices.

    6x7 up to 11x14 when pulled from a flatbed should be OK, but I'd definitely send off slides if you're doing 16x20's.
    New-ish convert to film.
    Pentax MX for 35mm
    Bronica ETRS for 645

  7. #27
    StoneNYC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Connecticut, USA
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    7,794
    Images
    225
    Quote Originally Posted by fretlessdavis View Post
    +1 on Dwayne's. It's where I send my slides and occasional C-41. They do very well when asked to match color to my slides. I've never been disappointed. Sadly, they don't do metallic, just Kodak Supra Endura Ultra Glossy or whatever.

    They're printing is much more reasonably priced, too.

    Metallic looks fantastic for Velvia and cityscapes and landscapes... or any shot with water in it. Not a huge fan of it for people or animal shots, though. Adorama's print shop does metallic at reasonable prices.

    6x7 up to 11x14 when pulled from a flatbed should be OK, but I'd definitely send off slides if you're doing 16x20's.
    I agree that metallic is best for Velvia and Kodachrome

    But they certainly DO print metallic... All of my color images by them are metallic.
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  8. #28
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Vic., Australia.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,659
    Images
    15
    Quote Originally Posted by Alan Klein View Post
    I shoot Velvia 50 in 120 mf 6x7mm landscapes. I scan and print at home with a flat bed and print small size 8 1/2" x11". What print process, paper, etc would you recommend for large prints let's say 16x20" and larger? Thanks. Alan.
    Edit: in outside lab.

    That's a pretty big size to be aiming for; not one I routinely gun for because of cost, chiefly on metallic paper (which includes the drum scan and post work).
    It is of course well within the ability of a 6x7 slide for printing. Landscapes come up beautifully printed on metallic media but really, you should ask for samples of each of the media that are of interest to you from the lab, including pearl, semi-gloss, cotton rag etc. My favourite besides metallic is Museo cotton rag. A lot of others can actually flatten the punchy nature of Velvia so you do need to ask for samples rather than gasp and faint when very dull, flat looking prints come back on media that you just know you should have tested before finals.


  9. #29
    Mainecoonmaniac's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,122
    Images
    6
    One option for digitized transparencies is you can print on different substrates. This includes something that simulates the old Duratrans material. http://www.apimaging.com/services_lightbox.html You can use light boxes to light them from behind. It looks quite different since the image is transmitted light, not light reflected off of a photograph. A lot of retail stores use this for displays.
    "Photography, like surfing, is an infinite process, a constantly evolving exploration of life."
    Aaron Chang

  10. #30
    fretlessdavis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Southern AZ
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    277
    Images
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by StoneNYC View Post
    I agree that metallic is best for Velvia and Kodachrome

    But they certainly DO print metallic... All of my color images by them are metallic.
    I actually didn't know that. Last time I ordered, their options were matte, glossy, and super glossy (not even sure what that menas... maybe I'm just going crazy), so the few shots I really wanted printed on metallic paper I mailed somewhere else to be scanned, then printed through Adorama...


    No reason to go anywhere besides Dwayne's then. As long as you do orders with lots of items, they're a really good deal for E-6 processing, too.
    New-ish convert to film.
    Pentax MX for 35mm
    Bronica ETRS for 645

Page 3 of 6 FirstFirst 123456 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin