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Thread: Camera Romance

  1. #31
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom1956 View Post
    Proper Hasselblad repairmen have a jig and a fixture of some sort for everything. And they have factory training. It would be like me thinking I could walk in to Eastman Kodak and do PE's job. Nevertheless, good work CAN be done on more rudimentary tools, if those tools are accurate. I've been in touch with a factory-trained independent on another site, and a getting a feel for what I can and cannot do. The number one rule I have for myself is DON'T fool with a particular adjustment if I don't have the right jig, fixture, or tool to undo my "adjustment" and put it back to spec.
    Within my limitations, I am getting a lot of things right, though I might have to make a forge to build a hammer, to hammer a nail.
    Tom, is this your way of describing your romance with the Hasselblad cameras? If yes, it's a bit awkward...
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  2. #32

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    I don't have any "romance" with inanimate objects. The closest I've been to one is the 1968 Camaro Convertible I got in Feb 1974, as my first car. And it's sitting all sweet and fine in my driveway now.

  3. #33
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom1956 View Post
    I don't have any "romance" with inanimate objects. The closest I've been to one is the 1968 Camaro Convertible I got in Feb 1974, as my first car. And it's sitting all sweet and fine in my driveway now.
    Yah, it's all tongue in cheek and fun this thread, but with a valid point that we maybe make the best photographs with the cameras we love best. Hence the thread title 'Camera Romance'.

    I bet that Camaro looks sweet.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  4. #34
    markbarendt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Bertilsson View Post
    Tom, is this your way of describing your romance with the Hasselblad cameras? If yes, it's a bit awkward...
    Geek love

  5. #35

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    It has all new quarter panels, floor pans, door panels--all original GM parts, that I welded in myself. Beautiful job. The old was dented and rusted and no good. Now that car doesn't have a thimbleful of Bondo in it. I'm putting it up for sale one day. Any potential buyers can inquire at my occupied cemetery plot.

  6. #36
    Mainecoonmaniac's Avatar
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    Ouch!

    Quote Originally Posted by Sirius Glass View Post
    Those that have know. The others wish that they could have so that they too could know.
    "Photography, like surfing, is an infinite process, a constantly evolving exploration of life."
    Aaron Chang

  7. #37
    pstake's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom1956 View Post
    It has all new quarter panels, floor pans, door panels--all original GM parts, that I welded in myself. Beautiful job. The old was dented and rusted and no good. Now that car doesn't have a thimbleful of Bondo in it. I'm putting it up for sale one day. Any potential buyers can inquire at my occupied cemetery plot.
    Sounds an awful lot like Camaromance, to me.
    Last edited by pstake; 03-17-2014 at 02:37 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: spelling!

  8. #38
    Jaf-Photo's Avatar
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    Hasselblads are beautiful cameras, no doubt.

    They are all about image. The images you take with them. And the image you get wearing one.

    Their biggest asset, however, apart from the mystique (or even romance), is the Zeiss lenses.

    That's what sets them apart from other MF cameras, I think.

    Also, back in the day a lot of wedding photographers preferred the Japanese variants, because they were cheaper, sometimes more robust and had good lenses too.

    Today, if you want good MF photography you can buy any of the classics for a lot less than a Hasselblad.

    And a person who's not a very good photographer won't get any better pictures with a Hasselblad anyway.

  9. #39

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jaf-Photo View Post

    And a person who's not a very good photographer won't get any better pictures with a Hasselblad anyway.
    In Ralph's hands, a Hassy knows it has to do its best.

  10. #40
    benjiboy's Avatar
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    [QUOTE=Tom1956;1624929]Proper Hasselblad repairmen have a jig and a fixture of some sort for everything. And they have factory training. It would be like me thinking I could walk in to Eastman Kodak and do PE's job. Nevertheless, good work CAN be done on more rudimentary tools, if those tools are accurate. I've been in touch with a factory-trained independent on another site, and a getting a feel for what I can and cannot do. The number one rule I have for myself is DON'T fool with a particular adjustment if I don't have the right jig, fixture, or tool to undo my "adjustment" and put it back to spec.
    Within my limitations, I am getting a lot of things right, though I might have to make a forge to build a hammer, to hammer a nail.[/QUOTE

    I was an apprentice trained precision mechanical engineer as a young man who worked for many years at a company who made turbine blades for Rolls Royce jet engines and I have the service manuals for all my cameras, but the more I look at them the less inclined to attempt to service them, modern cameras are such complex electro-mechanical devices they are not designed to be repaired by the man in the street on the kitchen table. I feel that part of being a serious photographer is paying to have your equipment serviced by professionals which is why although I don't have a houseful of cameras like some members of this site I have had all of mine for more than 25 years and they are all in good working order, and I can pick them up and know they will work.
    Ben

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