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  1. #31
    lxdude's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by StoneNYC View Post
    Thanks I was lost about the comments..

    But still not sure he used those massive bulbs in his work, the article didn't say he did. But if the look was purposeful and similar to Gregory Crewdson, then I can see the bulb being used.
    Oh, he used them, all right.
    He could not have frozen motion at night by natural light, and what electronic flash there was in the 50's would have not had nearly enough throw, and any combo rig that could throw like that would have been very expensive and more cumbersome. Flashbulbs ruled back then, and even now make a lot of sense for that scale.
    I do use a digital device in my photographic pursuits when necessary.
    When someone rags on me for using film, I use a middle digit, upraised.

  2. #32
    AgX
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    German and swiss portable electronic flashlights of the early 50s at a weight from 3-6kg had the same guide number as the strongest handheld flashlights of today.

  3. #33

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    Since we've drifted into flashbulb history. Here's what the Iaeger Drive In (3rd picture at the earlier Link link) site looked like a few years ago:



    I have an older friend who was actually still using flash powder occasionally into the 70's because he could get more light even than with bulbs. Color yet.

  4. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Crabtree View Post
    Since we've drifted into flashbulb history. Here's what the Iaeger Drive In (3rd picture at the earlier Link link) site looked like a few years ago:



    I have an older friend who was actually still using flash powder occasionally into the 70's because he could get more light even than with bulbs. Color yet.
    Is flash powder easy to make? It must be like a gun powder right?
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  5. #35
    Ken Nadvornick's Avatar
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    Magnesium powder and potassium nitrate. Pretty powerful stuff.

    When my son was in Boy Scouts we issued each scout a small bar of magnesium metal. In an emergency they had been taught to use the files in their all-purpose knives to file off a small pile of shavings and powder, then cover with as close to dry moss as they could find. Once lit it would start almost anything on fire. It will even burn under water. Very handy up here in the PNW rainforest climate.

    Fans of the Calumet C1 8x10 metal camera know that Calumet switched from magnesium to aluminum, thus adding about three pounds. The urban legend reason was that one day the local fire marshal arrived for a surprise inspection. The story goes that when he walked in and saw huge piles of magnesium shavings everywhere from the tooling being used, each almost fainted from shock.

    Ken
    "They are the proof that something was there and no longer is. Like a stain. And the stillness of them is boggling. You can turn away but when you come back they’ll still be there looking at you."

    — Diane Arbus, March 15, 1971, in response to a request for a brief statement about photographs

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ken Nadvornick View Post
    Magnesium powder and potassium nitrate. Pretty powerful stuff.

    When my son was in Boy Scouts we issued each scout a small bar of magnesium metal. In an emergency they had been taught to use the files in their all-purpose knives to file off a small pile of shavings and powder, then cover with as close to dry moss as they could find. Once lit it would start almost anything on fire. It will even burn under water. Very handy up here in the PNW rainforest climate.

    Fans of the Calumet C1 8x10 metal camera know that Calumet switched from magnesium to aluminum, thus adding about three pounds. The urban legend reason was that one day the local fire marshal arrived for a surprise inspection. The story goes that when he walked in and saw huge piles of magnesium shavings everywhere from the tooling being used, each almost fainted from shock.

    Ken
    Haha that's a great story! Both of them!

    I still have a magnesium stick from Boy Scouts

    I also have a bunch of magnesium powder from my dad's and my home chemistry kit from being a kid and experimenting. But not much left, just a few grams.
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  7. #37
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    A reprise of an earlier flashbulb post of mine. Flashbulbs rock...



    Here's an example of an entire aircraft hanger lit up nicely by a single Sylvania Press 25 bulb in a modest 5-inch reflector. You can see the shadows up behind the spotlight housings in the rafters to get an idea of just how much light was thrown. The camera was my Pacemaker Crown Graphic 4x5. The photo was made handheld at 1/200 sec. Sorry about the missed hotspot on the nose...

    The aircraft itself is Paul Allen's* B-25J Mitchell medium bomber restored to its ground attack configuration. The nose insignia is a tribute to Steven Spielberg's father, Arnold. During World War II, Arnold Spielberg served with the 490th "Skull and Wings" Bombardment Squadron, known as the "Burma Bridge Busters" and became a Communications Chief. He was the inspiration for many of his son's later WWII-based motion pictures.

    I'm told that on occasion Mr. Allen has closed down his Flying Heritage Museum and cleared everyone out of this hanger so that he and his good friend Mr. Spielberg could sit under this aircraft's wing while eating picnic lunches. Note that this bomber is not a static museum display piece. It is fully restored, fully air worthy (note the engine drip cans), and next scheduled to fly for the public this upcoming May 17th, weather permitting.





    Ken

    * Microsoft co-founder along with Bill Gates.
    Last edited by Ken Nadvornick; 03-29-2014 at 01:23 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    "They are the proof that something was there and no longer is. Like a stain. And the stillness of them is boggling. You can turn away but when you come back they’ll still be there looking at you."

    — Diane Arbus, March 15, 1971, in response to a request for a brief statement about photographs

  8. #38

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ken Nadvornick View Post
    A reprise of an earlier flashbulb post of mine. Flashbulbs rock...



    Here's an example of an entire aircraft hanger lit up nicely by a single Sylvania Press 25 bulb in a modest 5-inch reflector. You can see the shadows up behind the spotlight housings in the rafters to get an idea of just how much light was thrown. The camera was my Pacemaker Crown Graphic 4x5. The photo was made handheld at 1/200 sec. Sorry about the missed hotspot on the nose...

    The aircraft itself is Paul Allen's* B-25J Mitchell medium bomber restored to its ground attack configuration. The nose insignia is a tribute to Steven Spielberg's father, Arnold. During World War II, Arnold Spielberg served with the 490th "Skull and Wings" Bombardment Squadron, known as the "Burma Bridge Busters" and became a Communications Chief. He was the inspiration for many of his son's later WWII-based motion pictures.

    I'm told that on occasion Mr. Allen has closed down his Flying Heritage Museum and cleared everyone out of this hanger so that he and his good friend Mr. Spielberg could sit under this aircraft's wing while eating picnic lunches. Note that this bomber is not a static museum display piece. It is fully restored, fully air worthy (note the engine drip cans), and next scheduled to fly for the public this upcoming May 17th, weather permitting.





    Ken

    * Microsoft co-founder along with Bill Gates.
    I worked on the construction of the new hanger last year. One day, it was foggy, and they had pulled that plane out onto the tarmac. I didn't have a real camera with me but I got a couple of pictures with my cell phone.
    Dave

    "She's always out making pictures, She's always out making scenes.
    She's always out the window, When it comes to making Dreams.

    It's all mixed up, It's all mixed up, It's all mixed up."

    From It's All Mixed Up by The Cars

  9. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by StoneNYC View Post
    Cool! Is that one on the left a UV bulb!?? Good for what? Wet plate or tintype or something?
    The one that gets me in that picture of bulbs on display is the middle one, with two small blobs of...what, magnesium powder? at the end of the wires. I'm guessing that's a long-burning bulb for focal plane shutters, but someone else will undoubtedly know.

  10. #40
    StoneNYC's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ken Nadvornick View Post
    A reprise of an earlier flashbulb post of mine. Flashbulbs rock...



    Here's an example of an entire aircraft hanger lit up nicely by a single Sylvania Press 25 bulb in a modest 5-inch reflector. You can see the shadows up behind the spotlight housings in the rafters to get an idea of just how much light was thrown. The camera was my Pacemaker Crown Graphic 4x5. The photo was made handheld at 1/200 sec. Sorry about the missed hotspot on the nose...

    The aircraft itself is Paul Allen's* B-25J Mitchell medium bomber restored to its ground attack configuration. The nose insignia is a tribute to Steven Spielberg's father, Arnold. During World War II, Arnold Spielberg served with the 490th "Skull and Wings" Bombardment Squadron, known as the "Burma Bridge Busters" and became a Communications Chief. He was the inspiration for many of his son's later WWII-based motion pictures.

    I'm told that on occasion Mr. Allen has closed down his Flying Heritage Museum and cleared everyone out of this hanger so that he and his good friend Mr. Spielberg could sit under this aircraft's wing while eating picnic lunches. Note that this bomber is not a static museum display piece. It is fully restored, fully air worthy (note the engine drip cans), and next scheduled to fly for the public this upcoming May 17th, weather permitting.





    Ken

    * Microsoft co-founder along with Bill Gates.
    What gets me is the even-ness of light... If you used a modern on camera speedlight, the bright light would all be on the subject on the foreground and the background would be much darker...

    Is this a product of the press shutter being slower or the bulb itself?
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

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