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  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by benjiboy View Post
    You can discount any meter reading you get from digital cameras from your experiments because the light meters in digital cameras are calibrated to the particular camera model's sensor not to the sensitivity of film, ie. 100 I.S.O. in a digital S.L.R. can produce a different exposure to the same I.S.O. on film
    This makes sense.

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by RedSun View Post
    This makes sense.
    I can assure you this is true, U.K Professional Photographer Magazine did extensive tests in an issue of a few years ago and proved this I suggest your best course of action is to sell the the existing hand held meters you have and buy a modern digital meter that can do reflected incidental and 1° spot metering like the Sekonic L758, Kenko KFM 2100 or Gossen Starlite 2.
    Ben

  3. #23
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    ^+1 to benjiboy's previous post (#20). And on the whole subject of calibration of meters: no two meters will read exactly alike. There will always be a slight difference.
    "The real work was thinking, just thinking." - Charles Chaplin

  4. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by yurisrey View Post
    ^+1 to benjiboy's previous post (#20). And on the whole subject of calibration of meters: no two meters will read exactly alike. There will always be a slight difference.
    +2! Don't even get me started on people who use their camera's to meter scenes for other cameras. Too many variables (for example OP did not mention what lenses he used to meter.). If you can use a lightmeter, use it.

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by benjiboy View Post
    You can discount any meter reading you get from digital cameras from your experiments because the light meters in digital cameras are calibrated to the particular camera model's sensor not to the sensitivity of film, ie. 100 I.S.O. in a digital S.L.R. can produce a different exposure to the same I.S.O. on film
    Horse feathers.

    There is an ISO standard for digital just like there is for film.

    Properly set digital cameras can be reasonable meters. The wild cards are the settings and modifiers the users dial into their cameras.

  6. #26

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    I did a little further test with the D70 and D200. Filters won't make any difference. One lens is Nikor 28-70 (film) macro zoom. The other one is Nikkor 18-70 DX AF-S. The 28-70 uses 52mm filter and the 18-70 DX uses 65mm filter.

    On both cameras, the 28-70 film lens gives speeding reading of 1/20.
    On both cameras, the 18-70 DX AF-S gives speeding reading of 1/15.

    I know the difference is small (at least at this speed range). But lens has something to do with it.

  7. #27

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    Readings can be affected by lens extension, particularly in zooms, and also internal flare. I've given up trying to find two meters that read the same.
    Alex.

  8. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by RalphLambrecht View Post
    you can trust sunny 16.I calibrate or verify my meters with it.
    Ok Ralph! So sunny 16 means the light level is 14 and 2/3 at ISO 100 right? And that's for an 18% reflectance surface?

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chan Tran View Post
    Ok Ralph! So sunny 16 means the light level is 14 and 2/3 at ISO 100 right? And that's for an 18% reflectance surface?
    whatever gives youf/16at1/125sat ISO100in your examleor f/16and 1/250s atISO200etc.just google 'sunny 16'for more detailsbutyes,I have sunny 16 weather here in Florida right now and I'm measuring an EV of 14 and 2/3 at ISO100too.in bright sunny weather, sunny16 works all the time
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alex Muir View Post
    Readings can be affected by lens extension, particularly in zooms, and also internal flare. I've given up trying to find two meters that read the same.
    Alex.
    Idid send two GossenLuna StarF2s to Gossen to have them calibrated. for $50 they came back and read identical values ever sincebut I don't see why you need that.make adjustments until you can trust one meter and stick to it.if you look at two watches or two thermometers ,you can get confused too.Sticking to one is the ticket.
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

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