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  1. #11
    juan's Avatar
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    I've used one of the Zone VI models for years. A few years ago, I found a pair of "shooter's glasses" at a sporting goods store. They are a pair of sunglasses tinted yellow. I've found they also help me judge zones.
    juan

  2. #12
    BarrieB's Avatar
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    [B]Greetings David; Yes the length of string does equal the focal length of the lens: I hold the knot on my forehead above my viewing eye and find the area in the frame to be near enough. Linhof, and others made an optical Zoom finder with the field of view frames marked on the glass, these are sold on Ebay and elsewhere but the cut out frame does the job for me.
    BTW. you can work out a smaller cut-out in the sheet film proportions that is smaller and then you have shorter string lenghts and a smaller card to carry round. BarrieB.

  3. #13
    jovo's Avatar
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    Hmmm...I once went to Calumet in NYC to buy the viewing filter they were offering. Interestingly, the salesman talked me out of it. He suggested using a viewing card such as has been described already and reminded me to keep one eye closed to diminish the 3 dimensional view two eyes offer. He also suggested that squinting a bit would help since detail would be lessened but 'gross' contrasts would be more easily discerned. He was right. I've used such procedures since and been quite satisfied with the result.

    Additionally, a good excercise in dealing with color and value is to get a hold of a whole bunch of paint chip cards in a wide variety of colors from Home Depot or other paint dealer. Cut them up into individual chips and try sorting them into groups of similar values. Training your eye to recognize values despite their chroma helps one to do what the filter is used to do.
    John Voss

    My Blog

  4. #14

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    Peak

    Hi David,

    I got the two Peak viewers on ePay for about $20. I see them on there occasionally.

    Jon
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Peak.jpg  
    __________________________________________________

    A casual stroll through the lunatic asylum shows that faith does not prove anything.

    -Nietzsche

  5. #15
    Monophoto's Avatar
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    I've also noticed that the prices at the auction site for the Zone VI filters seem exhorbitant.

    Many years ago, I bought a Wratten 90 filter, and cut a piece to fit into a glass slide mount. I've carried it around with me for probably 20 years - took it out while shooting earlier this week for perhaps the fitst time in several years.

    So given the amount of use that I have for it, buying a wratten filter and devoting a spare glass slide mount makes more economic sense that paying a ridiculous price for a commercial model.

  6. #16

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    Hi David,
    I used a wratten 90 filter sandwiched between two pieces of clear plastic for years. When I lost mine I found that two pieces of clear c41 film (the end bits you get back with your prints) will work in a pinch.It's not exactly the same colour but close

  7. #17
    David Brown's Avatar
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    Thanks everyone! I appreciate all of the comments and advice.

    A very nice APUG member has actually agreed to send me a filter he no longer uses.

    I was just curious and now I can satisfy my curiosity. I'm also going to get me some string and frames. I'm just not as good at "pre-visualization" as some ... :rolleyes:

    Is this a great forum or what!

    Cheers, y'all.

    David

  8. #18
    edz
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    Quote Originally Posted by David Brown
    Anybody use a B & W viewing filter? Worth the cost and trouble?
    There are, in fact, multiple kinds of viewing filters--- perhaps Fred Picker never understood that (just as he never quite unterstood much but he had a lot of enthusiasm and was effective at selling snake oils). Ansel Adams seemed to go for the Wratten#90 but there are really better filters around.

    Are they worth while? I learned to use them back in my cine days. They are not, as commonly held here, for judging B&W but to judge lighting contrast. The light levels are attenuated so one can get a better indication of what kind of shadow detail might be possible and if fill lights are called for. One would use a set of other filters to judge the tonal separation. Together, I've found, one can better respond to conditions.

    I still sometimes carry my old DuPont viewing filter. Its colour is something between the panchromatic viewing glasses sold by Harrison or Tiffen and the yellow/amber glasses. If I want I then hold a yellow, green or red filter (if I'm considering one) in from of my viewing glass.
    Edward C. Zimmermann
    BSn R&D // http://www.nonmonotonic.net

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