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  1. #1

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    Close up filters for a Bronica

    I am about to purchase either; the two Bronica ETRSi Close Up filters or a set of Hoya Close Up filters. Does anyone have any information about comparisons between the two sets; apart from Bronica's massive price difference?

    I need this info pretty quickly for an up&coming job I've been asked to do.

    Thanx

  2. #2

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    What is the filter size you need? Most close up lenses are single elements and they're only okay. Nikon makes supplementary diopters with two elements which are excellent--I use them on my Pentax 645 lenses. They come in 62mm at the largest. Canon also makes two element supplementary diopters in 72mm and 77mm which are more expensive but also said to be excellent. I also have a set of Tiffen single element lenses that aren't bad but the two element models are superior.

  3. #3

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    Thanx Lee,

    My filter size is 62mm, Bronica do make close ups but they're £50.00 a piece, with two in the set. whereas the Houa ones are only £18.00 a piece with four in the set. If the expensive ones turn out to be the 'best' as opposed to just the most expensive, lke some stuff is, then obviously I'll go for them. However my money is staying where it is [in my grubby pocket] till I find out which is the better buy in terms of moneys worth.

    Thanx again....P.Berry

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by PB001
    Thanx Lee,

    My filter size is 62mm, Bronica do make close ups but they're £50.00 a piece, with two in the set. whereas the Houa ones are only £18.00 a piece with four in the set. If the expensive ones turn out to be the 'best' as opposed to just the most expensive, lke some stuff is, then obviously I'll go for them. However my money is staying where it is [in my grubby pocket] till I find out which is the better buy in terms of moneys worth.

    Thanx again....P.Berry
    Both the Bronica and Hoya are single element supplementary diopters. Unlike the somewhat pricey Nikon and Canon 2 element lenses, the added cost of the Bronica over the Hoya represents no real added value. I have Hoya, Tiffen, and Kodak supplementary diopters in various sizes. If you held a gun to my head and made me pick the "best"... my brains would be splattered on your shirt.

    If you REALLY want to improve your close focus capability, get a set of extension tubes. I use the S-18 extension tube on my SQ-series cameras when shooting headshots with the 150mm PS lens - a much better solution than supplementary lenses...
    Bob Fowler
    fowler@verizon.net
    Some people are like Slinkies. They're really good for nothing, but they still bring a smile to your face when you push them down a flight of stairs.

  5. #5
    glbeas's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bobfowler
    If you REALLY want to improve your close focus capability, get a set of extension tubes. I use the S-18 extension tube on my SQ-series cameras when shooting headshots with the 150mm PS lens - a much better solution than supplementary lenses...
    I give that a hearty second! I've tried closeup supplementary lenses and they were really bad about flaring with the slightest amount of stray light. You have to keep them well hooded to get anywhere light optimum results. Also they weren't quite so sharp as an extended lens.
    Gary Beasley

  6. #6
    AllanD's Avatar
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    I was disappointed to find the secondhand Bronica lenses I bought were single element, not the supposedly better cemented doublet. However, they only cost £15 and are multicoated, unlike the cheap "Regent" brand type I had before. I have not detected any obvious difference, but I really haven't looked too hard.

    The Hoya lenses are double coated. Multi-coating may have the theoretical advantage of less flare, but if you shade the lens properly (which you ought, as these lenses are just hanging out there, without any form of shading at all) I suspect that any differences will be minor.

    I have read that aperture is important with supplementary lenses. Every lens will have a best aperture. Shooting away from that aperture will decrease the performance of the lens. Apparently, putting a supplementary lens on the front will make worse the decrease in performance; single element more so than cemented doublet. Shoot at the best aperture, and these lenses can perform very well (especially the cemented doublets). Of course, for close-up work, you may have to shoot some way off the best aperture in order to get the depth of field you want. If this worries you, then its time for tubes etc.

    BTW, I remember SpeedGraphic (www.speedgraphic.co.uk) selling the Nikon 62mm close up lens for £60+. As this would be the cemented doublet referred to by a previous poster, it makes the Nikon lens much better value for money. However, I couldn't find it in the current online catalogue.
    Heat or light; it depends on your sensitivity.

  7. #7

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    You really should consider the Nikon lenses in 62mm. They don't come as a set, they are for sale individually as the 5T and the 6T. They cost less than US $50 each.

    I've used extension tubes with 35mm equipment. While they offer good results, they're usually more expensive than supplementary diopters, they take up more room in the bag and they increase exposure time. I haven't found the Nikon supplementary lenses to be bad about flare either.

    If you have a chance to look over John Shaw's "Close Ups In Nature", you'll find a great reference for doing close up photography with all types of equipment. Shaw's book turned me on to two element supplementary diopters.

  8. #8
    bobfowler's Avatar
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    I don't make a habit of photographing lens test targets nor brick walls, but it would be interesting to see the difference on film between supplementary lenses and extension tubes at various magnification ratios.
    Bob Fowler
    fowler@verizon.net
    Some people are like Slinkies. They're really good for nothing, but they still bring a smile to your face when you push them down a flight of stairs.



 

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