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  1. #21
    Charles Webb's Avatar
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    Practically all of my equipment was purchased new without much if any discount. Over the years I have purchased what was necessary to do a job with absolutely no thought of the item being a prestige or statis symbol. I have hung on to equipment that I seldom use because I know
    I can never afford to buy similar or the same quality again in the future.

    I have long been involved in repairing large format shutters/lenses so have purchased several good lenses with non working shutters at bargain prices.
    Today on ebay I find few bargains, as if the shutter dosen't work or parts are completely missing the cost of the item generally is outrageous. I really miss not being able to find "fixer uppers" buying them and maybe spending several hours working on them then putting them to work on one of my boxes. I have purchased and refurbished many B&J, Ansco, Kodak and other boxes just for fun. I don't do it for business purposes, but because I enjoy the challenge.

    I have two B&J 8x10's one I bought new and the other used. I have three 4x5 Graphlex's three press cameras and a Kodak view 11 phurchased new in the mid 1950's. Also have two 5x7 viewcameras a Korona and a Kodal D2 that I acquired somewhere along the line. All work very well none are for sale and they compliament my Hasselblads, Pentax 6x7, and Nikons very well.

    Is my camera equipment out dated? Yup, They surely are, but if I were to replace each item today it would cost me thousands of dollars, on the other hand if I sell out what I already own none of my stuff is worth anything!
    All of my equipment combined woulden't make the down payment on a ragedy zone six or near dead Dorf. Something about that don't seem right!

  2. #22

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    If you are ever going to buy new SLR now is the time to do it. The recent Nikon F6 will probably be the last analog SLR to be introduced. I really don't see anything beyond point and shoot cameras for 35mm being produced in a few years.

    With the exception of the point and shoot cameras and LF cameras, everything having to do with analog will be "out of date". Point and shoot cameras will be available in the third world for some time to come, and LF will always be a niche market with some form of film available.

    The last new camera I bought was a Bessa R2, last year. Before that the last "new" camera was a Nikon FA in 1987.

    My next out of date purchase will be a MF polaroid back I am going to adapt to one of the Speed Graphics I have sitting here in pieces.
    "Fundamentally I think we need to rediscover a non-ironic world"
    Robert Adams

  3. #23

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    I own far too much equipment, but I'm perfectly happy with what I have now. In terms of what I've bought and sold, I've noticed that I've gravitated towards equipment that I enjoy using.
    Somewhere around 1995 I sold all my Leica rangefinder equipment and bought a Mamiya RZ and lenses. Some of my best pictures of my kids growing up have been taken with the Mamiya, but I always "fought" with the camera. Too heavy to carry around all day (I used the prism), stupid depth of field scales on the side of the camera, floating element lenses that required you to set those elements seperately after focusing, since the lenses don't have helical focusing. I replaced the Mamiya with a Contax 645, which I consider to be best medium format camera available. Image quality doesn't match the larger 6x7 negative of the Mamiya, but, great handling, great viewfinder with agood manual focus screen, yet offers autofocus for those rare occasions when autofocus is advantageous.
    When my Leicaflex SL (with 50, 80, 90 and 180) broke last year, I replaced it with a Canon 7ne and a 135 f2, one of the finest lenses available. The lens is as great as advertised, but I found autofocus to be a disadvantage at least as often as it helped, and the Canon is terrible at manual focusing. I've since purchased a used Leica R8 (they're really cheap right now) and couldn't be happier.
    A final example, I used a Canham wood 5x7. Even though it's a great wood field camera, I was constantly fighting with the imprecise movements, rigidity problems and lack of film/lens plane parallelism typical of a wood camera (why should I have to stop down a lens to f16/f22 just to get all four corners of the ground glass sharp at the same time?). I purchased a Sinar P2 5x7 and find it to be the perfect view camera for me. The ease of use, rigidity, precision of asymetrical swings and tilts, depth of field calculator, make it worth the considerable weight penalty to me. I no longer blow any shots for "technical" reasons. Everything is always in focus and sharp. Any shortcommings to the negative are my compositional problems.

    And finally, if you own a Leica M, never, ever sell it. You'll just be compelled to buy another one, for more money!

  4. #24

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    Um, Lee, I haven't bought much of anything that qualifies as "current production" since 1986. In recent years I've bought mainly 2x3 and larger format gear dating from late WW-II to, probably, the mid-'80s. For most of what I do newer gear offers little in the way of better performance/capabilities and much in the way of greater cost.

    So for me, older and good enough is better than newer and not much improved. If I shot LF with significant movements, though, I'd be finding ways to get modern WA lenses, as they have much better coverage than my oldies.

    But I have found an exception. The discontinuation of KM has forced me to think about how to shoot close up with flash out-of-doors using ISO 100 E-6 films. After, that is, the freezer is empty. The backup body for my 1986 FM2n has been my wife's ELW, top sync speed 1/125. This is on the slow side, so I've been contemplating buying a newer AF Nikon body with top sync speed of 1/250. N8008 or -s, perhaps. I'm waiting for last month's hummingbird shots, done with an FG set to M90, 200 MicroNikkor @f/8 (right aperture for distance and flash output), and 283 with VP-1 set to 1/2. If they have significant exposure from ambient, that's it, gotta get another body to use with ISO 100 while I can still shoot KM in the FM2n. The reason for an 8008 instead of a new FM3A is cost.

    Thinking of cost, how DO the folks with the latest most best pay for it? I'm not poor, but some of the prices make me blanch.

    Cheers,

    Dan

  5. #25

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    In my opinion, there is no such thing as outdated equipment. Perhaps out of fashion would be a better term.

  6. #26
    winger's Avatar
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    I have several cameras of different ages, but I'd never consider them out-of-date as long as they work. My Pentax H1A doesn't need batteries, does what I tell it, and has some kick-butt prime lenses. It's older than I am, but I wouldn't call it out-of-date (at least not when it could hear me).

  7. #27
    Whiteymorange's Avatar
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    Out of fashion.

    Quote Originally Posted by glennfromwy
    In my opinion, there is no such thing as outdated equipment. Perhaps out of fashion would be a better term.
    I'm not sure there is a term for what we're all doing here. Of course we're out of date, but then the only ones who care about that are the ones who have to fit into some industry or system that dictates materials and methods (and here I include professionals who are shooting on deadline where digital images simply make more sense) or those hopelessly addicted to the latest and greatest.

    I admit, I'm a Yankee, and our motto is "Make do, do without, use it up and wear it out," but I think we are also about something else - making art with the tools that suit us.

    I have one camera made in the last decade. I have at least a dozen made in the first half of the twentieth century and a bunch more from the 70's. I use all of them.

    And when I need some new thing, even if it is the latest and the greatest, to make my art, I'll probably get it... used, of course.

    Whitey

  8. #28
    eagleowl's Avatar
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    I actually DO have...

    ...a digital slr,but that particular model was discontinued last year!
    I have a 35mm slr which has been updated recently(the updated version is actually INFERIOR to the model I have!),and I have a Mamiya tlr with 4 lens sets which I absolutely LOVE using.
    So,technically,all my equipment is out of date too!
    A common mistake people made when designing something completely foolproof was to underestimate the ingenuity of complete fools.

    Computers are incredibly stupid,but they are capable of being incredibly stupid many millions of times a second.

    Both said by Doug Adams

    Only put off until tomorrow that which you are prepared to die having not done-Pablo Picasso

  9. #29
    Dean Williams's Avatar
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    I have only one camera that was new within the past 20 years. All the rest are 20+ to well over 70 years old. Nothing (by category) made today can produce better photos than the "over the hill" stuff. So how can what I have be out of date? When Nikon, Leica, Canon or whomever come out with their next "latest and greatest" camera, my Spotmatic won't stop working. It'll still keep making stuff that's indistinguishable from the new kids. Progress is just another way of emptying our pockets.
    [COLOR=Sienna][FONT=Arial]Some days are diamonds. Some days a tree crashes through your roof.[/FONT][/COLOR]

  10. #30

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    i have cameras and lenses from the 1880s ( earlier for some of the lenses ) through 2 years ago ( Dslr ). i use the dslr for assignment work if they insist on it, and use the other stuff for everything else.

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