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  1. #11

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    This was playing with a yellow-green. I was playing with the filter to see the effect on bluebells in long grass. Sorry it's only a crappy shot as I said it was just a test.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails yellow-green.jpg  

  2. #12
    David H. Bebbington's Avatar
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    It's always difficult to make statements that apply to both European and North American light. It has always been my practice to use a filter (for years it was an orange one, the last few years I have switched to yellow/green) so I have no examples myself of unfiltered landscape shots, but I was told by Fay Godwin, for example, that she seldom if ever uses filters. Looking back at a collection of her work, many pictures have been taken in overcast weather, or early in the morning/late in the afternoon or evening and appear not to have been filtered - they have sky tone present but it is very pale. Others have apparently been taken closer to midday and look as if they HAVE been filtered! If, in the conditions you commonly photograph in, you need a filter to get the sky tone you like, it's obviously good to use one, but I don't feel filters are as vital as they were!

    Regards,

    David

  3. #13
    colrehogan's Avatar
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    I tried using a green filter a few times, but I didn't understand how it worked with b/w and didn't like what I got. It was interesting to use the green filter with color IR a few times, but I prefer to use my yellow filter with that stuff.

    I used to use red a lot with b/w, but more often than not, I don't bother anymore. I use my IR filters with IR film, but other than the occasional ND grad, I haven't used much in the way of filters lately either.
    Diane

    Halak 41

  4. #14
    glbeas's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aggie
    Now one that is hard to find but would also sometimes be good is a violet one.
    Have you tried a flourescent conversion filter on B&W film? They are a pale magenta color.
    Gary Beasley

  5. #15
    Monophoto's Avatar
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    Fords vs Chevy's. Boxers vs. briefs. Red wine vs. white wine. Life is full of choices.

    I have a green filter. I don't use it often. But if I encounter a situation where it might be useful, its there. The incremental weight of a Cokin filter is trivial (expecially in a pack that weighs 30+ pounds), and the CD case that I use to hold fiilters has lots of empty slots.

  6. #16
    Flotsam's Avatar
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    While "sky darkeners" are the most popular, (for good reason), filters of all colors can come in handy under the right circumstances. Sometimes tones that are easily contrasted by their color, become nearly identical grey tones when rendered in B&W. Just remember that a filter lightens its own color and darkens the others. A Green filter will lighten Green foliage while a Red filter, because of its high Magenta content, will darken it. Take a B&W shot of a Red flower against Green leaves and you can decide whether you want a dark flower against light leaves or vice versa. Of course there are other things that play into it but that what makes photography a life-long pursuit

    Here's an example, I shot this without a filter, took it home a souped it and didn't like it. The faded Red paint and the weathered wood, while clearly distinct by color contrast in the original scene, were rendered as nearly identical tones in the neg and print. I ran to the nearest camera store and bought a Green filter and reshot. The filter darkened the Red paint and gave me the separation that I wanted.

    It is also sometimes used for outdoor portraiture where it will lighten the foliage and darken the skin tones slightly.
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    That is called grain. It is supposed to be there.
    =Neal W.=

  7. #17
    gnashings's Avatar
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    Thank you all very, very much for your thoughtful input!
    I guess the answer is that the gentleman who wrote that article was a little broad in his assumptions, perhaps a little too generalized in his conclusions?

    I think I will do that little test - same light, same subject - all the same for a number of filters (of course adjusting for the exposure required by each), then perhaps take a little colour snapshot just to have as referrence. I was thinking of perhaps a collection of objects and plants and a person behind them. If nothing else, it will be fun.

    I think I will probably go through a "phaze" where I will abuse my filters, then most likely settle down they are new, and I have not really played with them much.

    Thanks again,

    Peter.

  8. #18

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    Peter just one last word of advice with filters that seems to be a stock rant from every picture editor I have worked with ... "Keep your bl**dy filters CLEAN!!". I'm sure we're looking forward to seeing your results

  9. #19
    gnashings's Avatar
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    Sometimes the simplest advice is the best! I can tell you that in my excitement over new gear, whatever it may have been, I have been foiled by dirt more than once, so this is one that I will definitely take to heart! Thanks again.

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