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  1. #1

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    What is the most archival process for photographic preservation.

    I am currently printing Ziatypes. I've read that they can have a pretty long life, something on the order of a Platinum print, (?) but considering the paper, I was wondering what the life could be? Everything seems to deteriorate eventually. If you were to create a picture to have the longest life possible, what would it be? Prerhaps a painting? They seem to stick around for quite a long time. But concerning photography, what is your archival process.

  2. #2
    George Papantoniou's Avatar
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    For what I know, pt/pd on a good quality paper is top. What do you mean, "considering the paper" ? I guess that the papers used for those prints are strong and stable and will not deteriorate in the next 1000 years... unless you store them in a very, very strange place...

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    As you say it all depends on the paper and how well it was processed. Some pt/pd are yellowing out because they were cleared with Hydrochloric acid and were not properly washed, this was back in the early days of pt/pd. With modern day methods, a pt/pd print will last as long as the paper is intact, the image will not fade or break down. Ziatypes should last just as long, pd is a noble metal and if processed well, it should have the same longevity as a pt/pd print.

    Another process that has long life it carbon printing (no, I dont mean ink jet prints), but care most be taken that non contaminated gelatin is used.

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    Joe Lipka's Avatar
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    How about a cave drawing? Thousands of years and still going strong.

    Photographically, I think Pt/Pd on good rag paper is probably the most archival.

    The real question is whether or not the image is worthy of such a long life...
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  5. #5

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    I would say the Daguerrotype since you are dealing with metals and no organic support.

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    Cave drawings might be the best. I did see a travel show last week or so that showed cave drawings in France I believe, that were really old. In that case, how much ARE caves nowdays?

    What processes are you guys using? Hypo clearing and selenium?

  7. #7

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    BTW

    This is an interesting page concerning negative preservation.

    http://palimpsest.stanford.edu/byaut...r/negrmcc.html

  8. #8
    Robert Hall's Avatar
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    Daguerreotypes, no, they are silver on copper. Both are fugitive metals. They may have a little less longevity than that of a silver print.

    The Platinotype is bonded to the paper. We have papers over 1500 years. I would say the pt/pd processes are your best bet.
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  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Hall
    Daguerreotypes, no, they are silver on copper. Both are fugitive metals. They may have a little less longevity than that of a silver print.

    The Platinotype is bonded to the paper. We have papers over 1500 years. I would say the pt/pd processes are your best bet.
    The only thing that is going to effect a Daguerreotype is hydrogen sulfide, as it would any silver image even one on paper. But with paper you must also deal with mold, mildew, book worm, silverfish, ...

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Hall
    Daguerreotypes, no, they are silver on copper. Both are fugitive metals. They may have a little less longevity than that of a silver print.

    The Platinotype is bonded to the paper. We have papers over 1500 years. I would say the pt/pd processes are your best bet.
    How are those 1500 year old papers being stored?

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