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  1. #11

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    I've been using GPS units for many years. My current personal GPS unit is the Garmin eTrex. It goes everywhere with me.
    Tom Hoskinson
    ______________________________

    Everything is analog - even digital :D

  2. #12

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    I have one originally purchased for fishing (boat) then used for geocaching but it went haywire and I never got around to replacing it due to getting a quote to get it fixed which was as much as to buy a new one. Recently read a post on a geocaching site about one with similar problem... turns out there was an internal battery that had gone flat! $3 for a new battery and $5 for a set of special screwdrivers needed to open it up. I haven't used it for remembering photo spots but may do now it is working again.

  3. #13

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    Alright Nige, I'll bite: What's geocaching?
    Graeme Hird
    www.scenebyhird.com

    Failure is NOT an option! It comes bundled with your software ....

  4. #14
    hortense's Avatar
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    I use a Garmin GPS V along with DeLorme Maps. These maps show most back roads and contours as well map coordinates (Long/Lat and WGS84 datum). In the few case were more detail was needed I have used BLM maps.

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Graeme Hird
    Alright Nige, I'll bite: What's geocaching?


    It's like a treasure hunt (except the 'treasure' is usually a nice place to visit). People hide caches (tupperware, ammo boxes) and upload the co-ordinates to a site (http://www.geocaching.com/ is the biggest) then everyone tries to find the cache using their GPS. There's many variations from simple to hard (can be the location is hard to get at, need to work out clues along the way, etc). When you find a cache you sign the log book to say you've been there, maybe trade an item in the cache and once home you can log it on the website (if you care about numbers and also to let other know the cache is still there).

    That's a rough idea... go to the site for a full run down and to see the size of it, and see if you've got some caches nearby!

    Just checked.. you've got a few near you!

  6. #16
    Lee L's Avatar
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    I use a Garmin GPSIII+ that I bought used for navigation (car, bicycle, and hiking) and recording good spots, and for locating potential good spots with mapping software from Oziexplorer and Delorme, and with imported aerial photos and topo maps. I have nature photographer friends who mark their spots with GPS as well, and have been guided to good spots by using their coordinates.

    If you want both FRS/GMRS radio and GPS in one package, look at the Garmin Rhino series. If you're in a group, these also have the capacity to transmit current coordinates to others in your group who have a Rhino radio/GPS, with compass bearing and distance calculated and displayed.

    Lee

  7. #17
    Daniel Lawton's Avatar
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    I recently purchased a Magellan Sport Trak Pro a little over a year ago. I decided to go with Magellan over Garmin's comparable model for one reason, its water proof. The Garmin's are great but as Mike said, you need to take special precautions if there is any chance of complete submersion. I had my Magellan stuffed in the cargo pocket of my trousers while wading through chest deep water in the Peruvian rainforest and the thing still functioned perfectly. After using it for over a year I haven't had any problems and recommend it highly. Garmin may make a waterproof model as well and if so it would be something to consider as well.

  8. #18
    djklmnop's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Daniel Lawton
    I recently purchased a Magellan Sport Trak Pro a little over a year ago. I decided to go with Magellan over Garmin's comparable model for one reason, its water proof. The Garmin's are great but as Mike said, you need to take special precautions if there is any chance of complete submersion. I had my Magellan stuffed in the cargo pocket of my trousers while wading through chest deep water in the Peruvian rainforest and the thing still functioned perfectly. After using it for over a year I haven't had any problems and recommend it highly. Garmin may make a waterproof model as well and if so it would be something to consider as well.
    Hmm.. I thought they all employed the standard water submission standard:

    Garmin's website for 60CS: Waterproof to IEC 60529 IPX7 standards (can be submerged in one meter of water for up to 30 minutes)

    SportsTrak Color:
    SporTrak Color is sealed (to IEC-529 IPX7 specifications) – and it floats!
    Money is not the problem. The problem is, I don't have any.

  9. #19
    Ed Sukach's Avatar
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    From the Garmin Manual:

    "The eTrex Legend is waterproof to IC Standard 529 IPX7. The internal electronics case can withstand immersion in 1 meter of water for 30 minutes although water will enter the battery compartment. Prolonged submergence can cause water damage to the unit. After submergence, be certain to remove the batteries and dry out the battery compartment before reuse."
    Carpe erratum!!

    Ed Sukach, FFP.

  10. #20
    Jeffrey A. Steinberg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by djklmnop
    Does anyone here use a GPS on their travels or outings?

    I think the two most essential tool to have is a GPS and a 2-way FRS/GMRS walkie talkie (aside from cell phones which most people already have).

    Any thoughts? Experiences?

    Andy
    I would suggest getting a ham radio (amateur radio) license. In the back woods, a small amateur portable walkie-talkie type radio uses a repeater system that is more likely to get you a signal when you are deep in the woods. GMRS radios have very short range in hilly areas.

    Getting a ham license is easy. its a 27 question (out of 35) test and the training materials are on the web and in book stores.

    Its the way to go from this ham/photographer. I have a Kenwood TD-7A that has a GPS input (Garmin GPS III is what I use) and using a technology called APRS, I can send my coordinates to a website that anyone can see.

    Check this out (this is my car broadcasting):

    http://www.findu.com/cgi-bin/find.cgi?call=k2mit-9

    I suggest this for anyone going alone (not suggested) or in a small group hike. You can easily broadcast your position should you get hurt and other APRS-compatible radios can see a text message with your position. or the website is available with your last known broadcast.

    --jeffrey, K2MIT
    --Jeffrey

    ______________________________________________
    Jeffrey Steinberg, K2MIT
    Scarsdale, NY

    www.jsteinbergphoto.com (my avocation)
    www.reversis.com (my vocation)

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