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  1. #21
    naturephoto1's Avatar
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    I title much of my work by the name of the location. Other times I will try to relate a title to the image, and in some cases I will use a tongue in cheek title. However, I sell most of my work through Art shows and will also be selling the work through galleries. The title aids the viewer giving them a reference; if they consider purchasing a piece in the future they want a way to find the image.

    Rich
    Richard A. Nelridge
    http://www.nelridge.com

  2. #22
    b1ltr1te's Avatar
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    Factual titles, providing a descriptor to a photo, whether it be a time, an event, a place, etc., really helps me connect to the work. It doesn't have to be a fancy schmancy title; I would rather it not be.

    I have nightmares about walking into a video store with shelves and shelves of videos lining the walls and all labeled "Untitled".

  3. #23

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    Tim, thanks for the explanation. That means in those cases where the parenthetical title seems a bit much (as sometimes happens in modern visual arts other than photography), it's because of the gallery's vision rather than the artist's. That's good to know---it will help me appreciate what the artist did without having to be too distracted by someone else's ideas about it. An artist could insist on "Untitled (No, Really---Untitled)," but I suppose that can be used only once.

  4. #24

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    I detest detailed, factual titles for landscapes unless someone is working for the local Chamber of Commerce, where I would expect it. What are you selling, your artwork or tourism? Anything much more detailed than "Western Wyoming, 1997" for pure, straight landscapes seems like Chamber of Commerce commercial hype to me. Untitled is much better.

    Other than that, it really depends. I rarely title my abstracts or landscapes (nor will I give anyone a detailed description of a location if they ask, because then they have already stopped thinking about the photograph itself and are thinking about the place). Other times titles just come to me that describe something of how I felt when making the photograph. Sometimes it will be a song title or words from a song, something like that. These may seem as corny or pretentious or nonsensical to others as some of the examples given above do to me, but oh well. I work primarily to please myself, and I dont title prints often. My photograph "Insomnia" in the gallery is an example, it explains how I felt at the time (surreal, green and sleepless) but it may or may not be helpful for someone viewing it. Neverthless, I cant seperate that title from it in my mind. I would never put a title of any kind on a actual print mount, but I usually make one up if I post something on the web. I rarely like those ones that I made up just to give it a title, I feel no connection to them.


    Wayne

  5. #25
    KenM's Avatar
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    Title them, don't title them - it's up to the photographer.

    However, if you do title your images, don't put the title on the front - if you mount your prints, place the title on the back. If you don't mount them, write the title in pencil on the back of the print.

    I can't stand photographs that have been titled - if I realize that a photo has been titled, I ignore the title until *after* viewing the print and coming to my own opinion. A title can (consciously or unconsciously) skew your opinion.

    Put another way, a title may prevent you from experiencing the print in the most fulfilling way - your way.
    Cheers!

    -klm.

  6. #26
    Christopher Walrath's Avatar
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    My photography is for me and me alone. So I title my photography accordingly. But I do minimalize the titles in EVERY instance. A B&W image of leaves in my gallery is entitled Plant#1 - 2006 and Plant #2 - 2006. A narrow Depth of Focus shot of texture on a marble headstone is entitled Marble - 2005. So I try to leave as much as I can for the imagination of the viewer. The titles are for my own classification alone. The image is for the viewers, myself included.
    Thank you.
    CWalrath

    "Wubba, wubba, wubba. Bing, bang, bong. Yuck, yuck, yuck and a fiddle-dee-dee." - The Yeti

  7. #27
    metod's Avatar
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    I don't like to name photographs, but sometimes I have no choice, as my Photo club does not accept ones without the titles. A lot of times I ask my wife to help me out with her fresh eyes and she usually saves the day. But I have to admit that sometimes a well-chosen title can help a photograph, mainly in the judging settings.

    Metod

  8. #28
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    Well, most of the time, to my knowledge, photographs are printed in books or displayed on the gallery wall with a title card. So - untitled photos get labelled 'untitled' which has sort of a huge stigma all it's own (can be sort of pretentious NOT to title them). But usually a title can refer to a given photo belonging to a series, or body of work.

    A title can be a really incredible opportunity to elucidate, or to provide a stronger context for or another way of looking at, an image. For example - I have a photograph of an anvil - that is very straightforward that was shot on type 55 neg. I printed it in color (beside the point) - but the image was a bit 'lost' or something until I came up with the title "structure for harnessing gravitational forces" - which I thought was kind of amusing and kind of witty too. But that's me. But the point being - I thought it really MADE the image. It puts the mind in a certain place when looking at the photo. So - in recap - yes, I think of titling as an opportunity to alter the conceptual context of a given image. Hell, why not?

  9. #29

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    i am on both sides of the fence here.

    i dislike cutsie titles, and sometimes i title things untitled, and sometimes not.

    if i title the photograph it is because i am trying to have the viewer see what i want them to see (direct them.) it doesn't matter if it is a documentary image of a building, a place, a portrait ... whatever --- the title has to do with what or who is the subject or what i want the viewer to think the subject is about (sometimes its the image, sometimes its a feeling, sometimes it is an illusion.) at the same time, i've also made armloads of photographs that i have called "untitled", because i don't have a title for them. they are abstract and can look like different things to different people (like looking at clouds or a rorschach test) so i don't bother. i know what these things are to me, but what i think doesn't matter (sometimes, its about them not me.)

  10. #30

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    I do not title photographs excepty maybe to note the location and date, like "Monument Valley, 1875 BC". I would never make a title like "Misty Dawn" (unless that was her name, of course).

    -R

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