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  1. #1
    Curt's Avatar
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    Busch Pressman C

    I have a Busch Pressman C with a 101mm 4.5 Woll Raptar lens. Does anyone know how the rack and pinion focuser works? No the Kalart Range finder or the Spotter or the Sports Finder or the GG. It's the plastic strip on the left top side of the extension rail. It reads from 4 to infinity. When the extension rail is fully retracted the plastic clear strip with the feet markings, 4 to infinity, lines up with the engraved markings on the extension rail. They are the same and superimpose. When I rack out to focus close up the top rides over the bottom and there is no line on either to line up with. How does this plastic scale work?

    Thanks,
    Curt

  2. #2
    Denis P.'s Avatar
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    Curt, I don't have the Busch Pressman, but I do have a couple of Speed Graphics, and the "bed scales" (that's what they are usually called, AFAIK) can be used only for the marked distances - in your case (from what you've written above), the scales can be used from 4 feet to infinity - all provided that you have the appropriate scale for the lens you are using.

    Do the the bed scales match your lens? It's easy to determine: just use the ground glass and measuring tape: focus on something 4 feet away (measure with tape) and align the 4 feet mark on the bed scales - if the image on the GG is sharp, it works as it should. Repeat the procedure for other engraved distances and see if the image on the GG is sharp.
    One note, though: the lens panel (front standard) has to be racked out all the way to the infinity stops (you should have those, too!). If you don't have the infinity stops, you will have to use a magic marker or something to mark the proper position on the bed rails. If you don't rack the front standard (lens panel) out to the exact position on the rail where the infinity stops are, the bed scales won't work as advertised

    Now, if you want to do close-ups, the only method of focusing is to use the ground glass. If you don't like it, maybe you could make your own (paper) bed scales for closer distances - it will take some work, but it's doable. However, I still think that for close-ups, the only way to go is the ground glass.

    BTW, you could check out graflex.org site - the principle of Graflex (Speed Graphic, etc.) cameras is the same as for Busch Pressman - i.e. functions of the infinity stops on the bed rail, bed scales, rangefinder focusing, ground glass, etc. are the same - they migh only look a bit different. Once you grasp the concepts of those various "gadgets", you will be able to use your camera to its full potential.

    HTH,

    Denis

  3. #3
    Whiteymorange's Avatar
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    Curt,
    I got a Pressman at the end of the summer and, as far as I can figure, the infinity signs on the top and bottom pieces of plastic should line up and read clearly when your lens is resting at the infinity stops. The other figures will be out of line and difficult to read. As you focus forward with the bed, different sets of numbers will line up and become clear, indicating the center of focus at that point. Its a strange system, not the easiest to read and, it seems, tied to your one prime lens, though I'm not ceratin of that. There is an adjustment possible by loosening the two small screws on the side and sliding the top scale forward or backward.

    Mine came with the Ektar 101mm f4.5, a whole bunch of good 2x3 film holders a good flash and a 620 Adapt-a-roll that I have been able to convince to take 120. I'm hoping to get some time with it this weekend. I have a box of medium format lenses from old cameras that I hope to try out as well, so I'm looking at the best way to make lensboards. I've constructed a few for a 4x5 graphic and for a 5x7 Folmer Schwing but this may be my first foray into metal.

    Have fun with it!
    Whitey

  4. #4
    Curt's Avatar
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    Thank you all, I took another look at it and yes there are infinity stops and the camera has the original lens. The marks on the bed scale line up perfectly, I guess I did not look close enough before. It's kind of hard to read but It does indeed work. The camera has everything including an HR solenoid for the shutter. There is a Focuspot on the Kalart finder also. The only thing I don't have is a flash unit. Thats where the batteries are for the power to the spot and lens sync. If I can find one of these and a cable it will be complete. My main reason for getting this camera is the size. I am taking it on vacation. I usually use an 8x10 and 5x7 which I use for contact printing. Since I have a Beseler 45 I thought this would be fun to use. Again thank you all for your advice.
    Curt

  5. #5

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    Busch Pressman C Lens Boards

    Quote Originally Posted by Whiteymorange
    Curt,
    I got a Pressman at the end of the summer and, as far as I can figure, the infinity signs on the top and bottom pieces of plastic should line up and read clearly when your lens is resting at the infinity stops. The other figures will be out of line and difficult to read. As you focus forward with the bed, different sets of numbers will line up and become clear, indicating the center of focus at that point. Its a strange system, not the easiest to read and, it seems, tied to your one prime lens, though I'm not ceratin of that. There is an adjustment possible by loosening the two small screws on the side and sliding the top scale forward or backward.

    Mine came with the Ektar 101mm f4.5, a whole bunch of good 2x3 film holders a good flash and a 620 Adapt-a-roll that I have been able to convince to take 120. I'm hoping to get some time with it this weekend. I have a box of medium format lenses from old cameras that I hope to try out as well, so I'm looking at the best way to make lensboards. I've constructed a few for a 4x5 graphic and for a 5x7 Folmer Schwing but this may be my first foray into metal.

    Have fun with it!
    Whitey
    Hi Whitey, I have one of these - nifty camera! The simplest form of lens board for these is a square of flat aluminum (black ABS plastic or modeling plywood board is fine also). The dimensions are: 3/32 inches thick by 2 47/128 inches square. Holes are drilled in the 4 corners of the board to match the lens board mounting screw holes in the camera. For drilling lens/shutter mounting holes in wood or ABS plastic, I use a Forstner bit in a drill press. For drilling lens/shutter mounting holes in aluminum I use a circle cutter in a drill press.

    Hope this helps.
    Tom Hoskinson
    ______________________________

    Everything is analog - even digital :D

  6. #6
    Curt's Avatar
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    Hello Whitey, I have made lens boards out of aluminum 1/8" or 3/16" thick. Use the thickness that is appropriate to the camera/lens. I cut the aluminum on a table saw with a metal cutting blade. It is made for aluminum and brass, soft metals. I go slow and wear safety glasses. It cuts great and I have even done a relief dado on the back of one for a Calumet camera. I make the hole with a Lenox bimetal hole saw on a small drill press with the piece clamped down with a drill press vise grip clamp and a c-clamp. Nothing moves, that way it is very safe. The hole saw cuts so smoothly that there is no need to finish it. You could use a drum sander in the drill press to enlarge it if necessary. The hole saws come in a pretty good size range. I use the hole saw for wood too or I use a fly cutter hole drill/cutter.
    Curt



 

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