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  1. #1
    wildbill's Avatar
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    Did you know a Minolta Spotmeter F floats?

    I bounce my down a boulder this morning and into the river it went. It floated luckily and now i've got a very wet meter. I dismantled the housing in hope that it'll be okay.
    I may be looking for a another one if anyone has one for sale. I don't really want to get a different brand since i use it for lighting and it's the industry standard that i've gotten use to.

    vinny
    www.vinnywalsh.com

    I know what I want but I just don't know how to go about gettin' it.-Hendrix

  2. #2
    Dave Parker's Avatar
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    Been there done that more than once! always an expensive mishap,,hope things turn out okay!

  3. #3
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    Best advice for these situations is to flush out the instrument with distilled water then dry it out in a warm spot thoroughly.
    Gary Beasley

  4. #4
    Dan Henderson's Avatar
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    apparently Pentax does not build flotation into their meters. Last summer while photographing waterfalls I hear a "splunk" as I bent over. At first I thought I spooked a frog off the bank, then noticed air bubbles emitting from what looked suspiciously like the pistol grip of a Pentax/Zone VI spotmeter on the bottom of the pond...

    ...thank God for elderly Polish camera repairmen!


    web site: Dan Henderson, Photographer.com

    blog: https://danhendersonphotographer.wordpress.com/

    I am not anti-digital. I am pro-film.

  5. #5
    RH Designs's Avatar
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    I had a Spotmeter F which got wet and died. I sent it to Minolta for an estimate, they sent it back in pieces and wanted almost as much to repair it as a new one would cost. I bought a Sekonic ... Hope yours recovers!

    Regards
    Richard

  6. #6
    donbga's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by glbeas
    Best advice for these situations is to flush out the instrument with distilled water then dry it out in a warm spot thoroughly.
    No this isn't the best advice. Unless the liquid is very corrosive like sea water flushing with more water doesn't accomplish anything positive.
    Don Bryant

  7. #7
    glbeas's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by donbga
    No this isn't the best advice. Unless the liquid is very corrosive like sea water flushing with more water doesn't accomplish anything positive.
    Thats where you are off base Don. Immediate flushing with distilled water to remove dirt and salts that are dissolved in any natural source of water is recommended by any repair tech. The longer the dirty water sits in the instrument the more likely permanent damage is to occur if it hasn't already.
    Distilled water is nonconductive and will not damage electronics, and getting rid of any moisture from the dunking via flushing is the best course. If theres anything vital in the instrument that will dissolve in water it's probably a loss, but thats not very likely.
    Gary Beasley

  8. #8
    donbga's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by glbeas
    Thats where you are off base Don. Immediate flushing with distilled water to remove dirt and salts that are dissolved in any natural source of water is recommended by any repair tech. The longer the dirty water sits in the instrument the more likely permanent damage is to occur if it hasn't already.
    Distilled water is nonconductive and will not damage electronics, and getting rid of any moisture from the dunking via flushing is the best course. If theres anything vital in the instrument that will dissolve in water it's probably a loss, but thats not very likely.
    I didn't say that letting the water stay in the meter would be a good thing and I don't think flushing with distilled water is going to get rid of moisture or effectively flush out any mineral content found in fresh water. If there is any hope of saving the meter it wil be to dry it out ASAP.

    One friend of mine that dropped his Pentax spot meter in a stream in the Smokies was amazed that it still worked after letting it dry out. He didn't flush it with distilled water, nor did he even take it apart. IMO flushing with more water is just way over kill.
    Don Bryant

  9. #9
    glbeas's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by donbga
    I didn't say that letting the water stay in the meter would be a good thing and I don't think flushing with distilled water is going to get rid of moisture or effectively flush out any mineral content found in fresh water. If there is any hope of saving the meter it wil be to dry it out ASAP.

    One friend of mine that dropped his Pentax spot meter in a stream in the Smokies was amazed that it still worked after letting it dry out. He didn't flush it with distilled water, nor did he even take it apart. IMO flushing with more water is just way over kill.
    The pentax must have robust circuits, he was lucky. Many electronic instruments don't have the circuits sealed to moisture. What happens is the water dries and the salts concentrate on the surface and corrode metal surfaces. It doesn't take much to disrupt microcircuits. The mineral deposits can also create short circuits by bridging adjacent circuits.
    Certainly if theres no distilled available and the instrument is not horribly expensive it's worth trying to dry it out, but you risk irreversible damage to electronics in some of the more delicate circuits. The standard procedure for immersion is to keep it immersed until the repairman can disassmble and properly clean it. That way theres less chance if corrosion during drying.
    Gary Beasley

  10. #10
    wildbill's Avatar
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    Well, I've dried it overnite and put 'er back together. So Far it works and is dead on.
    I didn't flush it out. Maybe we've got good water here in L.A.
    www.vinnywalsh.com

    I know what I want but I just don't know how to go about gettin' it.-Hendrix

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