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  1. #1

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    Everyone likes to talk about the "best" or their "favorite" film, or film and developer combination.

    Just for fun, so that others can avoid making the same mistake, what's your experience and opinion of the worst film or film and developer combo - and most importantly - why?

    This is sort of like staying away from certain foods - my nomination for worst food - frozen spinach on a stick.

    My nomination for worst film - Velvia. Why? I had to do job for a client and was talked into using Velvia (given 5 rolls as free samples). I shot one roll as a test and it looked okay in that Velvia hyper-color sort of way. I figured that since the shot I had to do was at dawn, that it would maybe increase color saturation of the reds in the sky.

    Oooooh. Big Mistake. I shot three rolls of 120. Not one usable frame despite careful bracketing. It is the only film I think I've ever shot that had blocked shadows and blown-out highlights within the same frame. And that was the best exposure. The rest were either totally blocked or totally blown out. Nasty, nasty, nasty.

    I know, my fault. High contrast situation + high contrast film. Don't do this.

  2. #2
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    Classic/Fortepan 400. Consider this a film that maxes out with a density range suitable for N-1, good down to N-4 at least. Flat, flat, flat. Also the base is thin, edges rough, and the emulsion is very prone to scratches. I tested about 2/3 of a box of 8x10" and tossed the rest, figuring I could use the freezer space more than the film.

    Some films that are kind of off-the-scale "bad" can produce interesting effects. Fomapan T200 has a kind of 1930s steely grey kind of A. L. Coburn kind of Fritz Lang look. Not what I'd want to use every day, but it's interesting for atmospheric kinds of effects.

    I also have about 350 feet of 35mm Double-X movie stock that must be at least 25 years old that I keep around for effects. Very heavy base fog and grainy, but it's kind of interesting in Dektol--a very long scale film.

  3. #3
    lee
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    I too had 4 boxes of 8x10 Forte 400 and never used and then some fool offered to pay more than I paid and now it is taking up space at his house.

    lee\c

  4. #4
    c6h6o3's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by steve
    My nomination for worst film - Velvia..... The rest were either totally blocked or totally blown out. Nasty, nasty, nasty.
    Not to mention the absolutely bilious color balance. I wholeheartedly second your nomination.

    Try EPY with an 85B filter. You'll never use any other chrome film.

  5. #5

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    Short answer: Tmax in anything.

  6. #6
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    I also don't have much of a taste for the supersaturated films like Velvia or E100VS, and such.

    T-Max 100 has its place. It really produces a sharp smooth look for certain things. T-Max 400 has never appealed to me, though.

  7. #7

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    Hey! I shoot TMax 100!

    But only for my MF and 35mm and even then once in a while.

    Hmmmmmmmm.........worst film....

    I have a couple. I had bad luck with Fuji Neopan. It just seemed to have no contrast. Sort of turned me off.

    I also gotta say that I LOATHE Portra B+W film! What a dog! I got a pro-pack of the 120 just to play with it. I so far have had some good experiences with XP2.

    Well I forgot that not everyone thinks like Ilford. The Portra comes back with a HIDEOUS orange base to it! Now why the hell would I want that? Ick.
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  8. #8
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    I can't stand Tmax 3200, Delta blows it out of the H2o. Portra BW is designed to print on color paper on the same chanel as the portra color films. Great for event shooters, not great for artsy types . As far as chemicals go, I really dislike lauder chemicals. Something about selling working strength chemicals in gallon bottles scares me.
    hi!

  9. #9

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    I have a couple of film developer combinations I do not like, by starting with a developer I just cannot get decent results with TMAX developer no matter what film I use. I hate the results.

    OK for films, Agfapan 400 developed in D76 or Rodinal...ecch but Agfapan 100 is a different story. Kodak D3200 developed in anything. And last but no least 2 films from China called Shanghai GP3 and SHD-100. These are aold thick emulsion films taht work great in Pyro but the quality control is terrible and actually has dust and stuff stuck to the emulsion

    Thats it from me

    Mike

  10. #10

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    For me, anything NOT Kodak is good. Actually, for product/commercial and landscape work, Velvia is my favourite. For anything else, Provia 100F.

    For B&W, Panatomic-X is my favourite, but since it's discontinued, Polaroid 55 or 665 (it's Panatomic-X). Next would be Ilford FP-4, then HP5, Then PanF, in Ilfotec-DD-X.

    For colour neg, Fuji NPC, then NPH (the NEW NPH), then NPZ.

    My overall favourite portrait film...Ilford SFX in DD-X.

    Kodak colour film is too "pastel-ly" and has an easter-egg-like palette, even when printed on Portra. Since I run my own RA-4, Ilford Colors is my favourite paper.

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