Switch to English Language Passer en langue franÁaise Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 69,756   Posts: 1,516,005   Online: 857
      
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Goose Nest (near Martinsburg), West Virginia
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    46

    Using an iPhone in the field

    Iím photographing in Portugal at the moment, and have been having an interesting time using an iPhone as one of my primary tools. I havenít seen much here in the forums on the topic, so I thought Iíd summarize my workflow in case it helped anyone else.

    Iím shooting primarily Neopan 400 (in 6x7 format) on an RB67 with three lenses (65/90/180mm). Iím metering using my trusty Sekonic L-358. Iím using a tripod for everything, so thereís plenty of time for composition and exposure calculation.

    Although Iím quite familiar with shooting with only a camera & meter, Iíve found the iPhone is quite handy for the following (all apps are either standard Apple apps or downloadable from the App Store using iTunes):

    * Leveling

    As Iím composing on the tripod, Iím using the iPhone as a spirit-level, using the Clinometer app ($0.99). I launch Clinometer, then set the iPhone on top of the open RB67 waist-level viewfinder. I usually adjust for level only in the left-right axis, as the front-back adjustment is part of the composition and doesnít need to be Ďcorrect.í


    * DOF calculation

    Iíd like to say I use one of the many available DOF applications, but actually Iíve found that none of them are very intuitive or useful. I have downloaded PhotoBuddy, PhotoCalc, and Visual Dof Calculator. These apps might be helpful for someone with less shooting experience, but mostly what the apps do I can either calculate on the lens itself (using distance scales), or I know intuitively.


    * Reciprocity calculation

    So far Iíve just used the regular Calculator app (in scientific mode), with the formula found somewhere online of Tc=Ti+(0.3*Ti^1.62), where Ti is the indicated speed and Tc is the corrected speed.


    * Field notebook

    I use the standard Notes application to keep track of information about each roll and shots on that roll. I simply start a new note for each roll, using a sort of shorthand like this:

    081210. Rb67. Neopan

    1. Path. 8@125. 90mm
    2. Olive tree. 5.6@250
    3. Blue bird bench. 8@250
    4. ". 16@60. 65mm
    5. Steps w/ Goldfinger. 11@60
    6. Path with gutter around tree. 5.6@30. 90mm
    7. Wall with plants. 11@400
    8. Trellis. 8@400. 180mm-pol
    9. ". 8@60
    10. Stones. 16@250. 180mm-pol
    I use periods instead of other punctuation because itís easy to type ó on the iPhone, if you press the Ďspaceí button twice, you get a period followed by a space.

    The first line is the roll ID (I use year/month/day, plus Ďaí, Ďbí, Ďcí, etc. for additional rolls on a given day), camera name, and film type.

    The rest of the lines contain:

    • Frame number
    • Description
    • Aperture/shutter set
    • Lens, with any filters (Ďpolí = polarizer)

    If a value hasnít changed on a successive shot (eg, Iím still using the same lens), I leave that out, or use a double-quote mark.

    Iíll also note location, date (if different than the roll ID), and other information I want to remember.

    Once Iíve finished a roll, I simply email the note to myself. If Iím out of range of a wireless or cellular network, the iPhone will queue the note to be emailed later.


    * Reference shots

    I use the standard Camera app to take two digital photos of each shot: one is taken normally from roughly the same point of view, and one is taken of the viewfinder itself (with the magnifying glass up, which seems to give the best focus). This latter shot is often quite rough, but serves as a decent reference image until I develop the film.

    Just like with any photo on the iPhone, I transfer images back to the computer using iPhone.


    * Post-shooting organization

    Back on my Mac, I collect the roll notes and the reference images into a new folder. I rename the reference images to relate to the shots (eg, Ď081211.01.vf.jpgí is the viewfinder reference image for the shot #1 on the roll Ď081211í). I run a script I wrote to process my shorthand notes into EXIF tags; these tags are then written into the pair of reference images. (The tags mimic all the shot information, including exposure, camera type, etc.). I can then drag the set of reference images into Adobe Lightroom and, voila, all the metadata is accurate.

    Once I develop & scan the negatives, I copy the EXIF information from the reference shots into the new scan files. I can then delete the reference shots if I want to.


    * Whatís missing?

    While all this works reasonably well, there are definitely some things Iíd like to change.

    Using the Camera, Clinometer, and Notes app (not to mention the DOF apps) requires a lot of switching applications. This is tiresome on the iPhone, since I have to press the Home button and mentally readjust to the new app.

    It would be nice to making the process involve fewer button presses and be more transparent. Iím considering writing an iPhone app that would let you create a new roll, then add new shots to that roll. For each shot, it would let you take a variety of reference images. It would remember the information from shot to shot, and show a simple level control on the same screen. All the information would then be more tightly related to each other.

    Since my Sekonic meter can calculate exposure in EV units, it would be nice to simply input that number into an iPhone app which then helps me calculate aperture and shutter values based on a given ISO rating. This could also take into account filter & bellows factors, as well as reciprocity failure.

    A more intuitive and useful DOF calculation would be great. What I want is to be able to input the points I want in focus (eg, main focus on 2 meters, with 1 meter in front and 2 meters in rear to be in focus), and have the iPhone calculate the appropriate aperture, given CoC tolerance, film format, etc.

    Anyway, I hope this is useful, or at least interesting to those of you who have an iPhone, or are considering getting one.

    Is anyone else using an iPhone in the field?

  2. #2
    Barry S's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    DC Metro
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    1,234
    Images
    31
    I've been using Clinometer as soon as it was released to level my Deardorff, but I found a much better app than Notes. It's called YouNote and it allows you to make photo, written, typed, or voice notes and it records your location via GPS linked to Google maps. You can also create tags for notes that make it much easier to categorize information. It's not perfect, but it kicks the stuffing out of the plain jane Notes app.

  3. #3
    Robert Hall's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Lehi, Utah
    Shooter
    ULarge Format
    Posts
    2,040
    Images
    28
    Nice info there Gents, thanks very much.

    I use the iPhone's gps and mapping to save my bacon in strange places.
    Robert Hall
    www.RobertHall.com
    www.RobertHall.com/mobile
    Apug Portfolio
    Facebook Profile


    Technology is not a panacea. It alone will not move your art forward. Only through developing your own aesthetic - free from the tools that create it - can you find new dimension to your work.

  4. #4
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Washington DC
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    8,165
    Blog Entries
    51
    Images
    435
    I've used its timer for long time exposures at night when either I've forgotten my watch or it's just too dark to see the watch face.

  5. #5
    Robert Hall's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Lehi, Utah
    Shooter
    ULarge Format
    Posts
    2,040
    Images
    28
    Ok, LOVE the clinometer.
    Robert Hall
    www.RobertHall.com
    www.RobertHall.com/mobile
    Apug Portfolio
    Facebook Profile


    Technology is not a panacea. It alone will not move your art forward. Only through developing your own aesthetic - free from the tools that create it - can you find new dimension to your work.

  6. #6
    winger's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Page County, IA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,374
    Images
    47
    Thanks so much for this. I hadn't gone through the list of just how many apps are out there to find everything you have. Cool, now I can find them!

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    16
    Images
    1
    Well, this is a bit of self-promotion, so people, you can ignore it, but I also use it to store a database of development times (that I developed myself, thus is the self-promotion) called FND (film is not dead)

  8. #8
    jeroldharter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    1,958
    Images
    1
    iPhones are nice but using the ExpoDev software on a Palm phone is much more functional.

    Of course you need to do some calibration but for about $50 you can have the view camera store do the densitometer work and enter it into the Plotter software and email you the file for the Palm phone.

    I enter the EV high and EV low values along with my Zone placements, desired f-stop and the software determines the exposure time, calculates reciprocity failure, deals with filter factors and bellows extension factors. It has a built in timer for multi-second exposures that works well. It allows for written notes about exposures and keeps track of film and lens focal length. It determines development time for each sheet of film and stores the information in a Microsoft Outlook memo that automatically syncs with my computer. The software works with both spot meters and incident meters. They have a large number of built in film-developer data that you can use if you don't want to do your own testing.

    On my phone, I can also take a digital photo or video of the scene I am photographing and make voice memos.

    I don't think the medley of deconstructed iPhone applications can compare to this.
    Jerold Harter MD

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Goose Nest (near Martinsburg), West Virginia
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    46
    Quote Originally Posted by ctarda@mac.com View Post
    Well, this is a bit of self-promotion, so people, you can ignore it, but I also use it to store a database of development times (that I developed myself, thus is the self-promotion) called FND (film is not dead)
    Yes, I know your application (both on iPhone & Mac), although haven't yet used it. Thanks for developing it!

  10. #10

    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Goose Nest (near Martinsburg), West Virginia
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    46
    The ExpoDev software does look very functional, especially for large-format photographers. Folks reading this thread might want to check it out at ExpoDevPalm, along with the companion Plotter software.

    However, the developers of the software don't seem to be very Mac friendly: only Outlook synchronization is mentioned, and Plotter doesn't run on a Mac without emulation software. This, along with ExpoDev's $100 price tag, limits the appeal for me. I wonder whether BZTS is looking into creating an iPhone version of ExpoDev?

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  ó   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin