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  1. #21
    Poohblah's Avatar
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    CCD's are analog, but the data gathered from them are often immediately converted to digital information for storage, just like in digicams. I'm sure that's what the Hubble does.

  2. #22
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    There's a diagram and explanation of the BIMAT system here: http://www.lpi.usra.edu/resources/lu...oduction.shtml
    Interesting stuff.
    Lens caps and cable releases can become invisible at will. :D

  3. #23

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    Fascinating, thanks!

    Richard


    Quote Originally Posted by ben-s View Post
    There's a diagram and explanation of the BIMAT system here: http://www.lpi.usra.edu/resources/lu...oduction.shtml
    Interesting stuff.

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by bobwysiwyg View Post
    Found this;

    Quote:
    The Hubble Space Telescope has two kinds of instruments: (1) imagers, which take pictures; and (2) spectrographs, which analyze light. Imagers are electronic detectors called charge -- coupled devices (CCD's). The CCD's convert light into electronic signals, which an on -- board computer records and sends to the ground.
    CCD's are analog devices, as are the chips in D cameras. The D part happens in a converter. Un-digitized output contains the most information, but it has to be managed, and that usually involves a computer.

    I have a very expensive video camera that makes very good looking pictures that uses CCD's but is fully analog. It is completely possible for an imaging device to be fully electronic, but not be digital. Many people don't realize this. Hubble may be an example of that- the digitizing may take place on the ground. IDK for sure, but it would make sense to have the most unaltered information available, and the highest resolution of anything is always analog.
    Last edited by JBrunner; 01-04-2009 at 05:56 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  5. #25

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    I may be wrong but last upgrade to the Hubble's computer system was an Intel 486DX chip. The
    first with built-in math co-processor. The Hubble runs no background crap, Windows, e-mail, screen
    saver, pretty pictures. It just crunches numbers. Wonder if next upgrade will be to an Intel Pentium 1 ?
    I'm still running a Pentium-Pro myself. I don't use computers for photography or music, just for
    number crunching.

    Best regards,

    /Clay

  6. #26
    jmooney's Avatar
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    Where do you think the last of the Ektar 25 got to?

  7. #27
    Joe VanCleave's Avatar
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    The 486 processors in the Hubble are also radiation hardened, so they're not just off-the-shelf, consumer grade components. I think Intel ran a small, specialty Fab line of these products for government/military space applications.

    ~Joe

  8. #28
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    The government has intel and others make a whole series of specially hardened computers which are designed to withstand the environment of space and the EMP of nuclear war! The computer is essentially encased in a Faraday cage for additional protection over what is afforded by the chips' design.

    PE

  9. #29
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicholas Lindan View Post
    Well, it ain't analog...

    "1990 ... In light of it's age" Age?, AGE?, AGE???? The thing's not old enough to drink beer. My father was reminiscing last night about the time he went to see Lenin speak in fomenting the Russian Revolution. And he's that's not _that_ old. 110, now you're getting old.

    In any case the conceptual design started in 1969, with real design work beginning in '81. It carries multiple imaging systems, most of which have been upgraded over the years.

    CCD's for imaging have been around since the early 70's.

    However, space missions use only proven technology and tend to be many years behind the 'state of the art'. 1970's missions, like Voyager, used magnetic deflection vidicons and video tape recorders - the image was captured in near-real time and then sent back to earth very slowly. A very slow signal can be more easily picked from the noise of the eather, allowing the satellite to use a very low power transmitter.

    By the time Hubble came around CCDs for space imaging were reasonably mature and in wide use in surveillance satellites. The Hubble has been described as a spy satellite that happens to be pointing the wrong way.

    The wide-field camera of Hubble eye-candy fame is a CCD array imaging through a multitude of fine bandpass filters. The images are then 'false coloured' to translate the image for human eyesight.

    Googling will reveal web sites with more Hubble information than you could ever want.
    Nope. I worked on Voyage and programmed the science platform to take the Jupiter Rotation Movies and the Red Spot Movies. Voyager used CCDs.

    Steve
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  10. #30
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    All sensors, CCD or CMOS are analog. Both types have been around since the 1960's.
    Coming back home to my film roots. Canon EOS-3 SLR, Canon EOS 1V SLR, 580ex flash, and 5D DSLR shooter. Prime lens only shooter.

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