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  1. #51
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    Threads merged, title updated.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  2. #52
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    AFAIK, Jim, the Blad is in orbit. But then so is all of the human waste from orbital missions. All shuttles have to be decontaminated on return.

    So, you are welcome to the blad.

    PE

  3. #53

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    Hello everybody...

    Does anybody know anything about the photosystems of the Ranger missions? IIRC, these probes were used to map the lunar surface and all of them crashed on the moon (on purpose). Given the fact that they would have an accelerated descend to the lunar surface, would there be any time to develop, scan and transmit images? How was it done?

  4. #54
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    They used a method whose name shall not be mentioned here on APUG.

    PE

  5. #55

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    Ah, it's the D word Real pioneers then!
    Thanks a lot PE.

  6. #56
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    Now that these threads were merged I saw the second post in this thread, regarding the method of scanning film processed in space using the zero and one number set. I wanted to point out that the Orbiter was indeed a fully analog system; ie the image data from the film negataives was transmitted, received and viewed on earth in the analog domain.

    The light passing through the film, modulated by image density, was sensed by a photomultiplier tube through the associated light-collector optics. An electrical signal proportional to the intensity of the transmitted light was generated, amplified, and transmitted to the ground receiving station.

  7. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anon Ymous View Post
    Hello everybody...

    Does anybody know anything about the photosystems of the Ranger missions? IIRC, these probes were used to map the lunar surface and all of them crashed on the moon (on purpose). Given the fact that they would have an accelerated descend to the lunar surface, would there be any time to develop, scan and transmit images? How was it done?
    The Ranger missions (before the Orbiter missions) used analog acquisition and transmission of images, like a TV camera.

    Like the Ranger, the Orbiter's last close-ups of the moon were intended to be taken on the way in from a crash landing. I guess the photo-processing station needed to remain intact...still figuring that one out.

  8. #58

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    The Russians tried to develop MANNED spy satellites back in the early days. How's that for analog? There was just a PBS documentary on this pretty fascinating idea.

  9. #59
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    Just to elaborate, the TV monitor on the earth was presumably similar in resolution for the Ranger and Orbiter missions (and as pointed out, the screen was photographed with a 35mm camera, to make prints). The advantage of the Orbiter was that the images on the TV on earth were basically an enlargement of a portion of the moon scene captured on the film. The whole picture was not seen until the 35mm film on earth was processed and printed, and the photographs were pieced together. Thus they improved the resolution from Ranger to Orbiter, using the same analog TV style transmission of the image data back to earth.

    When you understand it you can see that the in-space processing of the film was a very, very clever thing to do to improve the resolution of what we would get back at earth.

    What they don't tell you on the internet is the failed system they tried in between Ranger and Orbiter. Basically it used a film camera but instead of processing the film, a mechanical device automatically placed the exposed film in a Kodak pre-paid mailer. (Ha Ha)

  10. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by ic-racer View Post
    The Ranger missions (before the Orbiter missions) used analog acquisition and transmission of images, like a TV camera.

    Like the Ranger, the Orbiter's last close-ups of the moon were intended to be taken on the way in from a crash landing. I guess the photo-processing station needed to remain intact...still figuring that one out.
    The processing was not analog as it was too slow. I watched the live transmission of the crash landing on the moon and the last frame was sent real-time and was only 1/2 frame as the craft landed on the moon during transmission. The shot was taken from a few hundred feet up and sent immediately.

    NASA wanted to get images up to the last second.

    PE

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