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  1. #1

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    Loading Plastic Negative Reels

    I use a spiral reel with two little clips that hold the film. The reel works by twisting the sides back and forth until you get to the spool, which you cut off.

    Most of the time this type of a reel works great, unless it is wet. If the reel is not perfectly dry it is impossible to load the film because it sticks to the plastic.

    But I have devised a way to overcome that problem, that is: When you load the film, have a bowl of water to dip the reel in. Continue dipping the reel in the water until the roll is loaded.

    It works like a charm! Try it!

    blgray

  2. #2

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    I use a hair-blow dryer to dry the reels in a few minutes, then it's on to the next rolls.

  3. #3
    Stock Dektol's Avatar
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    That sounds like a big mess to me. I, like many use a changing bag. I assume for this method you would need a dark closet.
    I will NEVER stop developing...

  4. #4

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    Compressed air works well too. 100psi blows the moisture off the reels. I have about a dozen reels, so I can use a few while the others are drying. I rinse my reels with very hot water before drying. I never have problems with film sticking.
    Rick Jason.
    "I'm still developing"

  5. #5
    PhotoJim's Avatar
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    I solved the problem by having lots of reels.

    I have 2-, 3-, 5- and 8-roll Paterson tanks, and enough reels to fill them all with 35mm film. That way I pretty much never run out of dry reels. (Even if I do, by the time I've done four batches of film I'm ready to be done anyway.)
    Jim MacKenzie - Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada

    A bunch of Nikons; Feds, Zorkis and a Kiev; Pentax 67-II (inherited from my deceased father-in-law); Bronica SQ-A; and a nice Shen Hao 4x5 field camera with 3 decent lenses that needs to be taken outside more. Oh, and as of mid-2012, one of those bodies we don't talk about here.

    Favourite film: do I need to pick only one?

  6. #6

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    I only have one reel so far!

    I just got my darkroom up and running after about 20 years. I have a stainless tank with 5 metal reels, but I have not been successful in loading one.

    I plan on getting more plastic reels, or a tank that will hold more than one reel.

    What brand would suggest?

    Thanks,
    blgray

  7. #7
    Stock Dektol's Avatar
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    I would go with Patterson- very durable and it's a somewhat modular system. The reels can go in most of their tank setups.
    I will NEVER stop developing...

  8. #8

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    You can't beat Paterson!!

  9. #9
    naeroscatu's Avatar
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    I never heard of submerging the reels in water to load film. There are so many things that can go wrong in doing that. I also use a changing bag to load film. I have more than one set of reels but if I need to re-use one that is wet I just dry it out with the hair-blow dryer.
    Mihai Costea

    "There's more to the picture
    Than meets the eye." - Neil Young

    Galleries:My PN & My APUG

  10. #10

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    I think it's a good tip, I never would have thought of it but you never know.. it could save you one day.
    I destroyed my last plastic reel after having ruined a roll of 120 with half-moon crimp marks all over the edges.
    Threw it so hard it shattered. Then I went stainless, now I don't throw them.

    There are those old jobo reels, you can just slide the film onto it. And those Kodacraft/Arista apron tanks look neat for just one roll.. I bet you could load those when wet.

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