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  1. #51
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AdClem View Post
    I didn't acquire my medium format gear new, but I know it came from a good home. It was previously owned by a police force scene of crimes unit, and I got it as a job lot at auction.
    My RB67 came from West Yorkshire police photographic department. Some of it had never been used and all of it had been very well looked after.


    Steve.

  2. #52
    eddym's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Smith View Post
    Is that a real word? In the UK we say burgled.

    It's usually the US version which is shortened rather than our version.




    Steve.
    According to Webster, not only is "burglarize" a word, but so is "burglarious," and even better, "burglariously"! In fact, whoever broke into our house did it burglariously! :o
    Eddy McDonald
    www.fotoartes.com
    Eschew defenestration!

  3. #53
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by eddym View Post
    burglariously
    What a fantastic word. I must try to use it one day.

    I bet it's not in the Oxford English Dictionary though.



    Steve.

  4. #54
    AutumnJazz's Avatar
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    All of you guys getting stuff replaced with insurance...is it being replaced by homeowner's insurance?

  5. #55

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    nope none of my stuff could be replaced through insurace.
    my deductible for the bike was more than i had ( poor college student )
    i did have work stolen from me by a big company, but they covered their tracks
    well enough that lawyers could help (even though i had emails &C that declared full admission of guilt ) ..

    oh well, its just lessons learned ... and i am sure i have a lot more lessons to learn down the road ...
    if my apug gallery looks empty you might check these places

    website
    blog
    sell-site

  6. #56
    bowzart's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Smith View Post
    What a fantastic word. I must try to use it one day.

    I bet it's not in the Oxford English Dictionary though.

    Steve.
    It is. I just looked it up on my wife-the-poet's OED unabridged CD. I added the underlined bold.
    ----------

    burgle, v.

    ("b3;g(@)l) [A back-formation from burglar n., of very recent appearance, though English law-Latin (1354) had a verb burgulQre of same meaning.]

    a. intr. To follow the occupation of a burglar. b. trans. To break feloniously into the house of; to steal or rob burglariously.

    "1872 M. Collins Pr. Clarice I. iv. 63 The burglar who attempted to enter that room would never burgle again." "1874 Standard 14 Nov. 3 New words with which the American vocabulary has lately been enriched; ‘to burgle’, meaning to injure a person by breaking into his or her house." "1884 Blackw. Mag. 513/2, I burgled myself again in the night."

    1884
    1874
    1872



    Hence "burgled ppl. a., and "burgling vbl. n. and ppl. a.

    "1880 Daily News 28 Oct. 5/3 Treachery seems to have been developed even in burgling circles." "1884 C. Dickens Dict. Lond. 28/3 A gentleman of the burgling persuasion." "1885 Graphic 14 Feb. 151/1 After the ‘burgling’ is completed." "1886 Phelps Burglars in Par. vii. 117 ‘Oh’, said the mistress of the burgled cottage+to the policeman."

    ------------------------------------------

  7. #57
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    I keep an old Oxford dictionary here at work and much to my surprise, I have just found burglarious in that. not burglarized though (or burglarised as it would be spelled in Britain if it originated here).

    That is obviously a past tense word as is burgled which we use. Is burgled used in the US? And is it in Webster's dictionary?



    Steve.

  8. #58
    Stephen Frizza's Avatar
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    An X-pan camera at a police function, one week after purchasing it. :-(
    "Its my profession to hijack time" ~ Stephen Frizza.

  9. #59
    Tony Egan's Avatar
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    My first ever camera an Olympus Trip was stolen from my car on a Friday before a long weekend in 1981. It was in a bag in the back of my Honda wagon parked on observatory hill in Sydney. I mean, it had a blanket over it! Thieves aren't that smart are they? Anyway, had to drive several hundred miles that winter weekend with a broken rear window and also missing my favourite woollen jumper (sweater).

    There was a positive I suppose. That theft got me researching my first "real" SLR camera which ended up being an OM2n leading me down this long slippery path. I eventually sold the OM2n after 25 years but still have an OM1n for using all those lovely Zuiko lenses from time to time.

  10. #60
    bowzart's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Smith View Post
    I keep an old Oxford dictionary here at work and much to my surprise, I have just found burglarious in that. not burglarized though (or burglarised as it would be spelled in Britain if it originated here).

    That is obviously a past tense word as is burgled which we use. Is burgled used in the US? And is it in Webster's dictionary?

    Steve.
    Burgle is in the American Heritage Dictionary (we still use the really great first edition), as is burglarious. The AHD traces it back to latin "burgulator", which the OED seems to clarify as Latin used in English law, not necessarily from Rome -- "burgul".

    The OED citation (the OED unabridged is the authoritative reference for professional scholars, and is not always easy for us semi-literate types to understand) dates its first appearance to 1354. I like to use the OED but am left somewhat confused by it because I don't know all the abbreviations. For my wife it has enormous value - once in a while.

    I love that phrase from 1884 -- "A gentleman of the burgling persuasion." This thread is about the consequences of the actions performed by such gentelmen.



 

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