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Thread: Film and water

  1. #11
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    If you drop film in water before exposure it can damage it by leaving spots or sticking together. If it happens after exposure, the best route is to totally wet it, keep it wet and then process with a good prewet before the process starts.

    If you drop your camera in water and know the guts got wet, place it in distilled water and soak well, then dry well. Check to see if it works. If so, you are clear. Remove the film beforehand and wash well then run the process cycle when the film is still wet.

    PE

  2. #12

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    Put the camera in your car on a hot summer day and the water will all disappear. Dont know where it goes...

    LOOK!!! A Camry!!! Quick, take a pitcher!!!

    more later, if you can stand it...

    paulie

  3. #13
    tiberiustibz's Avatar
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    I dropped my camera in the lake once. It was a cheap one, though, and continued to work despite being drowned. The film was fully exposed. When I wound it back in the film got scratched and it stuck together. The film still processed fine and beyond the physical damage I didn't notice any problems.

  4. #14
    Martin Aislabie's Avatar
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    I once got one of my 35mm cameras so wet with rain that it stopped working - the film would only reluctantly advance, the internal exposure meter stopped and finally the mirror locked up.

    Then the film would then not re-wind - it has managed to "glue" itself to the pressure plate with all the rain water that was now inside the camera

    Left the whole thing undisturbed on a radiator to dry out - it took many days for the internal misting to clear.

    However, when it fully dried out, neither the film nor the camera had taken any long term harm.

    However it was “only” rain water - which is about as pure as you can get.

    Having experienced getting a camera and film that wet - I wouldn't recommend it for others to try

    Martin

  5. #15
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    I had a Minolta SRT of some vintage get wet in Cave of the Winds at Niagara Falls. The film would not advance, the meter did not work, the shutter did not work. By the next day everything was back to normal. No problems with the film.

    Steve
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  6. #16

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    Mythbusters tried orange juice in trying to resurrect "results" from an old episode of McGuyver. They failed for a variety of reasons to make it work. They were trying it on color film as well, so they were jinxed from the start.

    Exposed film dropped into water should be salvageable if kept wet, in the dark, and processed promptly. Trying to dry it out would make it stick to itself. Unexposed film dunked in water would lose its anti-halation dyes and maybe some sensitizing dyes. It might make for an interesting experiment to unspool it, soak it in water, dry it, put it back in a cassette and run it through a camera, but the results would be unpredictable.

    Peter Gomena

  7. #17

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    A guy I used to work with in a barely heated darkroom with no running hot water would routinely add hot coffee to the D76 to bring his developer up to temperature.

    The trouble with wet film comes when it dries out.

    If its rolled like in a 35mm canister with nothing in between the rolls of film it would stick together. If I dropped exposed 35mm or 120 film in the lake or (more likely) it got dunked in the water in my ice chest - where I store it in zip locks while traveling in the summer. I would try to keep it wet until I could get it on a reel and into the developer.

    Thinking about it, that would be the best way to dry it out - put it on a developing reel and the let it hang out in a dry developing tank until dry. Then you would have to move it to another light tight storage.

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