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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by BetterSense View Post
    A submersible pump? Would you put it in a bucket or something, and maybe get a float switch?
    If it was me, and I wanted to maximize functionality without a major replumbing, I'd do exactly that. The sink would drain into a 5 gal bucket and a submersible pump from the bucket to the drain.

    Now, the apartment is on the second floor. Assuming the pipe runs straight down at least a couple feet, one could possibly stuff one of those check-valve-ended quick-siphon hoses down the pipe low enough to simply start a siphon.
    My guess is that you'd tire of this fairly quickly. I'd be easier to go to your funnel approach. I'd use one of those large funnels with the long flexible spout.

    I think gravity feed is the way to go. If I get a pump like that I can never brush my teeth or shave in the sink, which I may want to do, having only one each of wife and bathroom. It's true that the sink will be inconveniently high, but at least I'm tall.
    I'm not sure that a pump would preclude tooth brushing or shaving. Certainly a sump type pump would not. But I agree that gravity feed is best (gravity hasn't failed us for many, many years ). But, even without a trap under the sink, it likely would raise the sink up high. If not too high, that's the way to go.

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by mgb74 View Post
    ...gravity hasn't failed us for many, many years ...
    It has on occasion here in earthquake village.

    Back on topic, I'd go with a 5-gallon bucket containing float switch-controlled submersible sump pump. Not too expensive and mighty convenient. It could empty through a clothes washer drain hose. They have a U at the end to hook into that 4-foot high wall drain pipe.

  3. #13

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    I recently picked up a discontinued utility sink complete with legs and faucet for about $30 at the local Big Box. It's around 2X2X1.5 Feet. I don't think you'll have much success draining into the wash drain without a pump though. The water has to be lifted around two feet to get to the drain. The five gallon bucket with a fountain pump should work but probably wont keep up if you're trying to wash with a constant flow.
    What about finding a sump pump on craigslist? just set it in the bottom of the sink & let it run.
    I use an upside down plastic milk crate to set a dishwash tub on. You could put a sump pump under a milk crate.
    Heavily sedated for your protection.

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by John Koehrer View Post
    ...
    What about finding a sump pump on craigslist? ...
    Or try here: http://www.dallas-habitat.org/outlet/index.php

    (The OP was in Dallas I believe.)

  5. #15
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    Even though we aren't completely moved in yet, I already got a small stainless-steel bathroom sink on craigslist, with one of the high-looping faucets that you can easily stick stuff under. I also bought all the plumbing I should need to directly drain it into the drain and some 2x2s to build a frame for it. Since it's fairly shallow it will only end up about 6-inches higher than a typical bathroom sink, which is too short and makes you lean over anyway IMO. I'll post pictures eventually.

  6. #16
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    I built a portable plumbing unit including a variable temp shower valve using copper tubing and solder. There was a thermometer attachment used to be sold in photo stores that took a dial thermometer. All I have to do is pound a nail in the wall in the right place to hang it up, connect it to the outlets with laundry hoses, and turn it on. I had great temperature controlled water. I used ball valves for hot, cold, and tempered water. If I need to move, I undo the hoses, drain it, and put it in a box.

    It looks like a strange musical instrument, but works great.

    Oh yes, for a drain, I got a switch at Sears (I don't know what you would find there today) that had a switch controlled by a float. I happened to have a pump. The water drained into a five gallon plastic bucket, and when that got full the pump turned on.

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by bowzart View Post
    I built a portable plumbing unit including a variable temp shower valve ...
    Did you find the shower valve "precise" enough? I.E. could you alter the temp in 1 or 2 degree increments?

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by mgb74 View Post
    Did you find the shower valve "precise" enough? I.E. could you alter the temp in 1 or 2 degree increments?
    I could do c41 and e6 with it - until the hot water started to run out, that is. Watch out for other people using the water, though; that can effect the temp.

    It isn't as good as the Wing Lynch unit, or that other one that some apug folks are using -- the computerized ones -- but it beats two faucets with a big stick. It is plenty good enough for black and white processes.

  9. #19
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    I installed the sink temporarily last night. Since my faucet is only a cold-water faucet and I have a tee-fitting running to both hot and cold water, I stuck my digital thermometer in the running water and adjusted the two source spigots for a steady 21C. I'll have to see how consistent that is. Although I will be using my 5-gallon container of room temperature deionized water for development anyway.

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by BetterSense View Post
    The drain is about 4 feet high, up with the spigots, so if I put in a sink it would have to be like a foot higher than a normal bathroom sink, not that that's a problem.
    If that's a little too high to be comfortable, you might be able to use a high stool or chair (like a bar stool) to help matters.

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