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  1. #11
    Nev
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    Thanks Dan, sounds like a good idea too. Bellows I take it is the foldy thing? yes, I said 'foldy thing'. Ill check out graflex too.
    Reason for me liking the old vintage look and Holga look is I creat haunting photos. So I dont need them perfect but I need to have an old vintage creepy gothic haunted feel to them. As for the Brownie I think that might be a little too low tech because from what I have seen so far is that they produce too much blur. Though, maybe it all has to do with the photographer and condition of the camera I dont know. My source was flickr. :P
    So far the help you have all given me is great and can help start me out.

  2. #12

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    you might also think about shooting onto paper instead of film.
    paper will give an look, that is different than film .. ..
    you can spool paper on 120 rolls, or use them in a sheet film camera
    cut to size. once exposed, the paper will be a negative and it can be contact printed
    to another piece of paper to become a positive print.
    yes, paper can be slow, anywhere from less than asa 1 to 25+ .. depending on
    what you are shooting with .. and it is easy to sunny 16 ( or sunny 11 ) ...

    have fun!

    john
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  3. #13

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    Foldy thing is the bellows all right. Unless you're referring to the photographer. Who may or may not be a wrinkly thing.
    The Pocket folders in post 10 would give the effect you want without having to go into debt to do it.
    The Graphics can be nice but unless you want to change lenses or are working quickly & want loaded film backs to swap there's no reason to spend the $$$.
    Heavily sedated for your protection.

  4. #14

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    Paper negs can be a fun way to go but remember that paper is not red sensitive so you'll get a very particular look. If you do something like that, another camera option is some of the odd sized sheet film cameras - I have an Ihagee that's postcard size (3 1/2 x 5 ish) as well as things like the Kodak Recomar 33 (which I think is 3 1/4 x 4 1/4). Watch out for bellows condition (especially on the red Kodak Premos) and the usual glass/shutter issues. But, a nice example of one of that ilk can usually be had for under $50, preferrably with a couple of holders.

    Dan

  5. #15
    Ole
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    Dan, your Ihagee is most likely 9x12cm, a relatively standard size in Europe. The "postcard size" is 10x15cm, almost 4x6".

    An elderly 9x12cm or 6.5x9cm plate camera with a "cheap" triplet lens, or maybe even better an uncoated dialyte, can be had for very little money. Just make sure you get plate holders with film inserts with it - matching holders to camera tends to lead to having a big stack of holders and almost as many cameras.
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

  6. #16
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    Another film to recommend for that "vintage" look is Fomapan 200. As mentioned previously, something with a vintage uncoated lens will stead you best. There are a lot of turn-of-the-century Kodak folding cameras that you can pick up for next to nothing that will have either a meniscus lens (no front element, but a rear element behind a variable aperture of some sort) or a Rapid Rectilinear, often in a ball-bearing shutter with perhaps three speeds. You can pirate the lens off of one of these and put it on a Speed or Crown Graphic, and shoot a traditional grain emulsion like Efke or Foma and get very close to what you're looking for. You can also get into alternative process printing; many processes do not need a darkroom as they are only UV sensitive, and they will give you that lower-contrast "spooky" look you're looking for.

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ole View Post
    Dan, your Ihagee is most likely 9x12cm, a relatively standard size in Europe. The "postcard size" is 10x15cm, almost 4x6".
    Ole,
    Thanks for jogging my memory. It's actually an ICA - "Postcard" Trix I believe is the model, with a 135 f6.8 Hekla lens. I think I have a half dozen film holders for that one. I have another ICA - their version of the Maximar - I think equivalent to the /7 Zeiss model. The latter once belonged to the architect of the Munich city hall ( at least based on the owner's plate on the side).

    Dan

  8. #18
    Nev
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    Im not so sure Id want to go any route where self development is involved. Just something I could take to a lab and get them to do some custom work. Only cause I have a small apt and Im a stay at home dad. No equipment or time plus chemicals around the little guys wouldn't be a great thing with the poor ventilation in the place. I appreciate the suggestions though because it would be pretty cool to do.

  9. #19
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    You could do Cyanotypes, and tone them in coffee - you'll get dark brown prints, very gothic, and cyanotypes only need water, Potassium Ferricyanide, Citric Acid and Ferric Ammonium Oxalate, all of which are reasonably safe to handle in the home. Do you want your children to eat them in bulk? No, but normal exposure amounts will be harmless. You contact print cyanotypes, so they only require enough space in the sink to have a tray full of water the size of the final print, and a window in which to expose the prints. Cyanotypes are often marketed as "sun print" kits to teach kids about photography, to give you an idea. Might actually be a good opportunity to share an activity with your kids, unless they're too small to handle a paintbrush with any accuracy.

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nev View Post
    I really wanted to create some vintage photographs of gothic architecture and people. Something that looks like it was shot pre 1940.
    I love wetplate but cant afford to go that route just yet.
    Is there a portable camera (that I can still buy film for and not have to develop myself) that would achieve this look with a specific type of film?
    I love the look of pictures like this: http://img.timeinc.net/time/photoess...oldiers_01.jpg
    (I dont want to photoshop)
    Thanks for any help you can pass along!
    Why not buy an old box camera? There are varieties for plates (which can be adapted to sheet film) and roll film. Agfa and Zeiss have 120 cameras. Those should be crummy enough to look "vintage".

    Remember that from 1900 on (hell, even in the 1800s) most cameras could take very nice sharp images. So you'll have to find a crappy one if you want a degraded "vintage" look.

    The box camera might just be the ticket. No focus, crummy lens, but they should still be sharp enough to be more than usable.

    Something like this:
    http://www.pacificrimcamera.com/pp/zeiss/tengor/54.htm

    Otherwise maybe pick up a 4x5 speed graphic. You can mount any lens on it, including things like magnifying glasses from the dollar store, old projector lenses, etc, which will give you plenty of interesting aberrations to play with. The speed graphic has a focal plane shutter (unlike most other large format cameras) so you can shoot through any piece of glass (or plastic!) imaginable - you don't need it to be mounted in its own shutter.

    Finally you might try screwing with negative desecration... like gandolfi's "kill your darlings":

    http://www.apug.org/forums/forum216/...-darlings.html
    Last edited by walter23; 03-10-2009 at 03:01 PM. Click to view previous post history.
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