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  1. #11

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    Is there any way, other than a light table, to view 120 transparencies?

  2. #12
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Darkroom317 View Post
    Is there any way, other than a light table, to view 120 transparencies?
    An overhead projector perhaps?


    Steve.
    "People who say things won't work are a dime a dozen. People who figure out how to make things work are worth a fortune" - Dave Rat.

  3. #13

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    Of course - a 120 format slide projector!

    They were made by a number of different companies, personally I have a Hasselblad PCP80, although before that I had a Procabin 6x7 for a short time - the 'blad lens is better quality and the use of a magazine feed is a lot easier to handle.

  4. #14

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    Try to get a second hand stereo microscope like this: http://seoenterprises.com/shop/image...roductid=16208
    and a flat light table. Place the table under the microscope and put your slide on it. I recommend the use of a light table over the use of a microscope that is already prepared for transmitted-light microscopy because of the known light temperature of common light tables.

  5. #15

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    Emil, I have several Kodak carousel projectors and I can tell you from experience that they really don't take up a lot of room. You can project a decent-sized image onto a wall from only a few feet, which should be large enough for most of the evaluating you'd be doing. If you got a stack-mount slide projector, that might take up even less room...Vivitar made a decent one, IIRC. Obviously you'd need to research the dimensions of each, but that shouldn't be too hard.

  6. #16

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    Scan your slides and view them on a monitor or via projection. The APUG gallery for example is comprised of scanned images, photographs and slides of varying dimensions. You would want to scan at resolutions that work best for your viewing equipment.
    Last edited by DannL; 05-12-2009 at 12:22 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    "Lo único de lo que el mundo no se cansará nunca es de exageración." Salvador Dalí

  7. #17
    Ektagraphic's Avatar
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    Some of the Dukane filmstrip projects sound like they will do you well. They will project rolls of unmounted film.
    Helping to save analog photography one exposure at a time

  8. #18

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    Nicholas Lindan;797468]Get a decent projector, used ones go for less than the cost of a good loupe. Kodak Carousels are the standard and have a stack loader accessory. 60mm WA retrofocus lenses are available for getting a large screen image in a small space.

    In addition, Kodak sold an Audio/Visual adapter which replaced the Carousel Lens. This A/V adapter had cranks and sprockets to show strips of slide film.

  9. #19
    Nicholas Lindan's Avatar
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    The A/V strip projectors are designed to show 1/2 frame - well actually full movie frame, 1/2 35mm still camera frame. The film moves vertically through the projector. The problem with projecting a roll of slides is that you need to take all pictures in one orientation or have a rotating strip film holder.

    Time has shown that putting slides in individual mounts is the best way to handle them.

    I even mount my most used 35mm B&W negatives in slide mounts - it cuts down on handling strips of film in the enlarger and eliminates the problem of scratches.

    Film strips are (were) used in A/V settings because of ease of handling, compact storage, and low cost. Scratched and dusty film was considered the norm.
    DARKROOM AUTOMATION
    f-Stop Timers - Enlarging Meters
    http://www.darkroomautomation.com/da-main.htm

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