Switch to English Language Passer en langue franšaise Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,910   Posts: 1,556,190   Online: 1035
      
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 19
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    ┼rhus, Denmark
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    86

    Viewing Slides - how?

    Hello!

    I have recently started shooting slide film, and I think it's a really great way to evaluate my shots.

    I have a small viewer for mounted slides (I don't have mine mounted) and it works really well, but it doesn't magnify enough for critical viewing. It's the kind with an opaque dome on one end, and the eyepiece on the other end, and the slide in between. But I need a way to see them bigger, and in more detail.

    What do you suggest I look for? I would love to have some device that let me see it bigger, but still backlit.

    I have of course considered a projektor, but I don't have space for one. Plus it's the whole backlight aspect that makes it interesting for me

    Thank you,

    Emil

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,106
    Quote Originally Posted by Emil View Post
    What do you suggest I look for? I would love to have some device that let me see it bigger, but still backlit.
    If space is an issue, a decent quality 8x loupe (magnifying eyepiece without a viewer attached) and a desktop light box (8x10 inches or so) ought to do the trick. For the light box, look for one with 5000K lamps.

  3. #3
    Steve Smith's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Ryde, Isle of Wight
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    8,609
    Images
    122
    When you say you don't have room for a projector, I assume you mean for the projector and screen and the space between them.

    It is possible to buy a projector with its own integral screen which looks a bit like a portable TV and is about the same size.



    Steve.
    "People who say things won't work are a dime a dozen. People who figure out how to make things work are worth a fortune" - Dave Rat.

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    ┼rhus, Denmark
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    86
    Steve, I know the type of slide viewer you mention, but I haven't seen one that would accept unmounted slide film. Otherwise that would be awesome.

    Where would one shop for a desktop light box?

  5. #5
    Ektagraphic's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Southeastern Massachusetts
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,739
    Images
    23
    I really reccomend picking up a projector. It is the best way to view slides. You don't need too much room for one. They are pretty small and can just project onto the wall if you need them to.
    Helping to save analog photography one exposure at a time

  6. #6
    Steve Smith's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Ryde, Isle of Wight
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    8,609
    Images
    122
    I'm not sure what you can do if you want to keep your slides un-mounted and, I assume, un-cut.

    When I was at school (30 years ago) we had a projector which took 35mm film from reel to reel horizontally (stills, not movie). It looked a bit like a modern version of a lantern slide projector. Not much use if you don't have room for it though.



    Steve.
    "People who say things won't work are a dime a dozen. People who figure out how to make things work are worth a fortune" - Dave Rat.

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    ┼rhus, Denmark
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    86
    Thanks for the input, all.
    For me it would be a lot of trouble cutting and mounting the slides, I am just looking for a way to evaluate before I have prints made or scanning.

    Anyone here use a microscope for evaluating? How much (or little) magnification is needed to see the fine detail?

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Essex, UK.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    478
    Images
    8
    Have a look for a Braun M330AF Novamat (or 350AF Paximat) monitor projector.

    http://www.morrisphoto.co.uk/Product...oryid~225.html

    You can project onto a wall or use the built-in screen that pops up. Extremely good. I have one and wouldn't be without it. I'm sure you'll be able to get one in Denmark.

    Paul.
    Paul Jenkin (a late developer...)

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    ┼rhus, Denmark
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    86
    Wow, that looks great (although a little expensive). 21x21cm screen! Do you know if it will take unmounted film?

  10. #10
    Nicholas Lindan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Cleveland, Ohio USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,376
    Images
    4
    Get a decent projector, used ones go for less than the cost of a good loupe. Kodak Carousels are the standard and have a stack loader accessory. 60mm WA retrofocus lenses are available for getting a large screen image in a small space. Some Kodaks have a built-in flip-out monitor screen.
    DARKROOM AUTOMATION
    f-Stop Timers - Enlarging Meters
    http://www.darkroomautomation.com/da-main.htm

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  Ś   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin